A man should never be ashamed to own he has been in the wrong, which is but saying, in other words, that he is wiser today than he was yesterday. - Jonathan Swift
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 58, 24 March 1992





SUCCESSOR STATES TO THE USSR

TATARSTAN SEEKS NEW RELATIONSHIP WITH RUSSIA. At a press conference
on 23-March, Tatarstan President Mintimer Shaimiev said that
the republic's immediate political task was to sign a bilateral
treaty with Russia on the principle of powers being delegated
from below, ITAR-TASS reported. He reiterated that Tatarstan
would not sign the federal treaty. Shaimiev envisaged delegating
responsibility for questions of defense and security to Russia,
in other words a confederal arrangement. At a press conference
in Moscow, representatives of the Democratic Party of Russia
who were in Tatarstan for the referendum as observers made accusations
of irregularities and obstruction. They forecast that the political
situation in the republic would deteriorate, and called for the
introduction of presidential rule and the removal from office
of the republic's leaders. (Ann Sheehy)

AUTONOMOUS REGIONS INITIAL FEDERAL TREATY. The Jewish Autonomous
Oblast and the ten autonomous okrugs of the Russian Federation
initialled the federal treaty in Moscow on 23-March, ITAR-TASS
reported. This means that the treaty, which delimits powers between
the federal authorities and its constituent territories has now
been initialled by all these territories except Tatarstan and
Checheno-Ingushetia. (Ann Sheehy)

RUSSIA AGAIN TO FUND BLACK SEA FLEET. Marshal Evgenii Shaposhnikov,
the CIS Joint Armed Forces commander in chief, has announced
that Russia will resume financing the disputed Black Sea Fleet.
Ukraine has been paying the fleet after freezing the bank account
containing the 250-million rubles allocated to the fleet by the
Russians. As reported on the 23-March "Vesti" television news,
Shaposhnikov said that Russia would now pay for the fleet without
relying on the services of the Ukrainian State Bank. (Doug Clarke)


SHAPOSHNIKOV ON THE KIEV SUMMIT. Marshal Shaposhnikov declared
himself to be very satisfied with the results of the 20-March
CIS summit meeting in Kiev, saying that they had "exceeded the
hopes which we had pinned on them." He was quoted in the 24-March
issue of Izvestiya as saying the unresolved issues-- the financing
of the armed forces, the draft, and the future of the Black Sea
Fleet--would be turned over to the governments of the states
for discussion. Now that Russia had its own Defense Ministry,
he thought that such contentious issues could be more easily
resolved at the state level. (Doug Clarke)

KRAVCHUK EXASPERATED BY RUSSIA'S ATTITUDE TOWARDS CIS "EQUALS."
Taking stock of the rift between Ukraine and Russia at the CIS
summit in Kiev, Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk told journalists
in a broadcast shown on 23-March on Ukrainian TV that he sees
no future for the CIS. "We want to have equal rights with Russia,"
he stressed, "and Russia does not." Kravchuk, as reported by
Reuters, went on to say that he was "starting to get worried"
about Russia's view of itself as the sole legal successor to
the USSR. "This is not something Kravchuk has invented," he pointed
out, adding "I was the one who always said we had common interests
with Russia and that they were a priority for us." The Ukrainian
president is facing mounting pressure from Ukraine's national
democratic forces to take Ukraine out of the CIS. (Bohdan Nahaylo)


CIS LEADERS ON DNIESTER CONFLICT. In a statement signed at the
CIS summit in Kiev on 20-March the CIS heads of state said that
they regarded the preservation of the territorial integrity of
Moldova as the cornerstone of their policy with Moldova. They
undertook to take measures to prevent the involvement of their
citizens in the conflict in Moldova, to do their utmost to see
that those already involved were returned to their place of residence
as soon as possible, and to deny transit through their territory
of armed formations and contraband weapons. The text of the agreement
was issued by ITAR-TASS on 23-March. Moldova had complained to
both Russia and Ukraine about Don Cossacks fighting on the side
of the so-called "Dniester Republic." (Ann Sheehy)

UKRAINE AND THE CONFLICT IN MOLDOVA. Reflecting Kiev's continuing
concern about the armed conflict in neighboring Moldova, the
Ukrainian Cabinet of Ministers has established a working group
to monitor the situation in the border zone. Radio Ukraine also
reported on 23-March that the number of refugees who have fled
across the border into the Odessa region of Ukraine has now risen
to over 7,000. (Bohdan Nahaylo)

ARMS SWAP IN MOLDOVA. Quoting "reliable sources," the Russian
Information Agency reported from Chisinau on 23-March that the
CIS military authorities would move the Moldova-based Commonwealth
air and paratroop units to Russia but leave enough military equipment
behind to equip the Moldovan armed forces. General Boris Pyankov,
a deputy commander in chief of the CIS forces, was in Moldova
that day to confer with General Ion Kostas, the Moldovan defense
minister. Western sources list the 98th Guards Airborne division
in Chisinau as the main CIS unit in Moldova. (Doug Clarke)

KOZYREV ON CSCE. The "Novosti" television program reported on
24-March that Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev met in
Russia's Helsinki embassy with representatives of Moldova, Romania,
and Ukraine on 23-March. [Radio Rossii reported on 22-March that
the Romanian president had called for such a meeting to be held
during the Helsinki CSCE meeting.] The point of the discussion,
according to a Russian Information Agency correspondent quoted
by "Novosti," was to discuss the conflict in Moldova. Using the
start of the CSCE meeting in Helsinki on 23-March as a forum,
Kozyrev argued that the "we should urgently raise the question
of creating a mechanism of peace-keeping forces and of creating
a mediation mechanism for, among other things, the conflict in
Nagorno-Karabakh," Western agencies reported. (Suzanne Crow)


NAGORNO-KARABAKH UPDATE. Iranian Deputy Foreign Minister Mahmoud
Vaezi told Western reporters in Erevan on 23-March that the Iranian-brokered
cease-fire in Nagorno-Karabakh was generally holding despite
some violations. Arriving in Helsinki on 23-March for the CSCE
Foreign Ministers' meeting, Armenian Foreign Minister Raffi Hovanissian
called for an international peace conference on Nagorno-Karabakh;
he and Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev both proposed
deployment of a CSCE peacekeeping force in the region. Speaking
at the UN, Armenian parliament Chairman Babken Ararktsyan said
that if mediation efforts fail the Karabakh crisis will intensify;
he also called for deployment of an international peacekeeping
force. (Liz Fuller)

GEORGIA TO BE ADMITTED TO CSCE. Georgia is to be admitted to
the CSCE today in Helsinki on the basis of international confidence
in former Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze's commitment
to human rights and the rule of law, Western diplomats told RFE/RL
on 23-March. France, Portugal, and Germany extended diplomatic
recognition to Georgia on 23-March and the EC stated its readiness
to do so; the US is still reviewing the recognition issue. (Roland
Eggleston/Liz Fuller)

GENERAL STAFF PLANS PERMANENT COSSACK FORMATIONS. A group of
officers within the CIS joint Armed Forces General Staff are
considering the creation of permanent Cossack military detachments,
Radio Mayak reported on 23-March. The officers, who are of Cossack
origin, are drafting new regulations, military ranks, a modern
uniform, and programs for appropriate military academies. Over
the last year or so, Cossack communities have been reestablished
in ten regions which had been traditionally settled by Cossacks
in Tsarist Russia. (Victor Yasmann)

RUSSIAN TRADE UNIONS TO PROPOSE ALTERNATIVE REFORM PROGRAM. Russia's
Federation of Independent Trade Unions (the official unions)
are preparing their own program for economic reforms which they
will present to the Russian government shortly, Interfax reported
on 19-March. The unions are critical of the reform program of
the Yeltsin government, which they say places too much emphasis
on foreign investment and Western aid, provides inadequate safety
nets for workers, and plans to move too fast with the privatization
of state property. (Elizabeth Teague)

UKRAINIAN STATEMENT ON PAYMENT OF USSR'S EXTERNAL DEBT. With
the aim of rectifying "distortions in CIS and Western media,"
a statement by Ukrainian Prime Minister Vitold Fokin was circulated
in Kiev on 20-March during the CIS summit, Ukrinform-TASS reported.
This recorded the signing in Moscow on 11-March of an agreement
whereby Ukraine and Russia will be co-chairmen in the Inter-State
Council on Servicing the Foreign Debt of the Former Soviet Union.
"Vneshekonombank, preserving the right of the competent bank,
acquires an international character, and will provide for complete
openness of operations to the Inter-State Council and, thus,
to all the CIS republics." (Keith Bush)

RUSSIAN BUDGET DEFICIT. The "Memor-andum on Economic Policy,"
published on 4-March envisaged a "huge" budget deficit during
the first quarter of 1992 for the Russian Federation. A document
issued by the Russian Ministry of Finance and reported in Izvestiya
of 23-March (as quoted somewhat confusedly by ITAR-TASS) spells
out some of the component factors of this defi cit. VAT revenues
will be far less than planned, owing to the fall in output and
in consumer demand. Revenues from foreign economic activity will
amount to 9 billion rubles, compared with a planned budgetary
income of 228 billion rubles. The reasons given are the "catastrophic"
fall in exports, the financial status of exporters, the destruction
of the oil refining industry, and the lifting of export duties
on what appears to be the bulk of fuel shipments. (Keith Bush)


PENSIONS TO BE RAISED BUT FUNDING UNCERTAIN. Economic adviser
to the Russian government, Aleksei Ulyukaev, confirmed that the
minimum pension will be raised to 550-rubles a month starting
in April, Radio Rossii reported on 23-March. However, on the
same day, according to Radio Moscow-2, the chairman of the Russian
parliamentary commission on social policy, Mikhail Zakharov,
told a session of the parliamentary presidium that pensions will
not be paid in full in April. The pension fund could not afford
to pay the higher interest rates introduced recently, and the
government had not made the necessary provisions for this. (Keith
Bush)

PAVLOV ATTACKS THE PROSECUTION. Sovetskaya Rossiya published
on 21-March an open letter by former USSR Prime Minister Valentin
Pavlov to the Russian general prosecutor Valentin Stepankov.
Earlier, it was reported that Pavlov has spent the time since
his arrest in conjunction with last August's attempted coup reading
legal literature; now, Pavlov accuses the prosecution of having
violated the Russian Federation Code of Criminal Procedure while
investigating his case. The charges brought against him, Pavlov
said, are not precise, as required by law. Pavlov also denies
that he joined "a conspiracy aimed at seizing power." He had
enough power and could not get more, Pavlov writes. Moreover,
he claims to have wanted to resign his post long before the attempted
coup in August. (Julia Wishnevsky)

NEW UKRAINIAN CONSTITUTION TO BE UNVEILED SOON. Work on Ukraine's
new constitution is nearing completion. Radio Ukraine reported
that on 23-March President Kravchuk chaired a meeting of the
parliamentary commission charged with its preparation. Among
other changes, the new draft envisages the replacement of the
Supreme Council by a bicameral National Assembly. (Bohdan Nahaylo)


KRAVCHUK TO VISIT INDIA. Radio Ukraine reported on 23-March that
President Kravchuk will be paying an official five- day visit
to India, beginning on 25-March. (Bohdan Nahaylo)

AMNESTY IN TURKMENISTAN. On the eve of Navruz, the Persian New
Year widely celebrated in Central Asia, Turkmen President Saparmurad
Niyazov issued a decree pardoning individuals sentenced for padding
cotton production figures, Radio Mayak reported on 20-March.
According to the report, the decree affects 41 people. Niyazov
said that the decree was motivated by recognition that such machinations
had occurred in response to the totalitarian system and command
economy of the former USSR. Although Turkmenistan's "cotton affair"
of the mid-1980s was not on the scale of that in Uzbekistan,
many officials, particularly in Mary Oblast, lost their jobs
and some were prosecuted. (Bess Brown)

CHANGES IN FORMER UZBEK COMMUNIST PARTY. The Communist Party
of Uzbekistan changed its name to the Popular Democratic Party
of Uzbekistan and discarded its Marxist ideology before the collapse
of the Soviet Union. According to the 28 February issue of Ozbekistan
avazi, there have been other basic changes as well: 53.6% of
the party membership is under 40, and 79% is Uzbek. Russians
make up only 4.3% of the membership, even less than the Kazakh
share (4.6%). (Timur Kocaoglu)

BALTIC STATES



ESTONIAN FOREIGN MINISTER RESIGNS. Estonia's Prime Minister Tiit
Vahi told the press on 23 March that Foreign Minister Lennart
Meri has submitted a request to be released from office. Vahi
said that after discussions with members of the government, it
was decided to accept the resignation. Vahi said that Meri had
done fine work in the realm of foreign relations and that his
release would not become effective immediately but at a more
suitable time. ETA of 23 March quoted an unnamed Estonian official
as saying that while Meri was very good at lobbying for Estonia's
independence, he was not good at running the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs. (Dzintra Bungs)

DUMAS OPENS FRENCH EMBASSY IN TALLINN. On 23 March French Foreign
Minister Roland Dumas participated in the ceremonies opening
the French embassy in Tallinn, Radio Lithuania reports. His visit
in Estonia was brief; on 24 March he flew to Helsinki for the
opening of the CSCE foreign ministers' meeting. (Saulius Girnius)


YELTSIN PLACES BALTIC BORDER TROOPS UNDER RUSSIA. Interfax of
20 March and Novosti of 21 March reported that Russia's president
Boris Yeltsin signed a decree placing the former USSR border
guards in the Baltic States under Russian jurisdiction. Lt. Gen.
Valentin Gaponenko was designated to deal with the border guards'
temporary presence and eventual withdrawal. Yeltsin also instructed
the Russian delegation to begin talks with the three Baltic delegations
on defining the status of the border guards and the procedures
for their withdrawal as well as setting the terms for joint patrolling
of the borders pending withdrawal. (Dzintra Bungs)

GAIDAR REMOVES SOME TRADE BARRIERS. Russia's First Deputy Prime
Minister Egor Gaidar has signed decree No. 186 "On halting export
taxes on goods from the Russian Federation to the Baltic States,"
BNS reported on 23 March. This decree temporarily countermands
an earlier decree--No. 91 of 31 December 1991--and will be effective
until 30 June 1992. The latest decree is expected to ease somewhat
the economic situation in the Baltics and make it possible to
implement some of the Baltic-Russian economic accords. The export
fees, calculated in ecus, practically stopped the flow of essential
goods from Russia to the Baltic States and had the effect of
a virtual economic blockade. (Dzintra Bungs)

ANOTHER INCIDENT WITH BORDER GUARDS. On 23 March Radio Lithuania
reported yet another incident involving the former USSR border
guards. An armed guard in the port of Klaipeda refused to allow
a Swedish businessman to board a Swedish ship exporting cement,
despite appeals by the ship's captain and Lithuanian customs
and defense officials. Demands by the Lithuanian authorities
that the former Soviet border guards cease their activities have
been ignored. The border guards continue to inspect all ships
entering and leaving the port, sometimes cooperating with Lithuanian
customs officials. Rimantas Sukys, deputy chief of the Lithuanian
customs post at Klaipeda, noted that 30-35 former Soviet customs
officials are now employed by Lithuania's customs. (Saulius Girnius)






CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE



OLSZEWSKI PRESENTS TOUGH BUDGET IN SEJM. On 23 March Prime Minister
Jan Olszewski unveiled a proposed budget in the Sejm that provides
for virtual elimination of remaining state subsidies. According
to Western media, the proposal faces stiff parliamentary opposition.
At a news conference, however, Olszewski pledged "iron determination."
The draft budget calls for coal prices to go up by 5% monthly
except for the summer months, natural gas to increase by 5% quarterly,
and central heating and hot water to go up 33% by October. Rents
for public housing would be doubled next month and train fares
would climb by 28%. Gasoline taxes and the price of medicine
would also rise sharply. The Sejm will debate the proposed budget
next month. Appearing with Olszewski, Finance Minister Andrzej
Olechowski said the vote "will determine whether 1992 will be
remembered as the year the recession was ended or year the financial
crisis began," adding that "in order to avoid a financial crash,
reforms must involve austerity measures." (Wladyslaw Minkiewicz)


SLOVAK PARLIAMENT REJECTS SOVEREIGNTY PROPOSAL. On 23 March for
the third time Slovakia's parliament rejected an attempt to proclaim
the republic's sovereignty. The legislation was proposed by Jozef
Prokes, leader of the separatist Slovak National Party. Czech
and Slovak opponents of such a declaration say it would be unconstitutional
and a step toward the breakup of the country. Prokes's sovereignty
motions have been thwarted twice in the past six months, but
a number of Slovak parties have adopted a declaration of sovereignty
as part of their platforms for the June elections, Reuters reports.
(Barbara Kroulik)

SLOVAK PARLIAMENT COMMISSION SAYS MECIAR WAS COLLABORATOR. A
Slovak parliament panel in a report released on 23 March says
that former Slovak Premier Vladimir Meciar, now chairman of the
republic's most popular political party, collaborated with the
former secret police (STB). The report says Meciar aided the
STB during the communist regime, operating under the code name
"Doktor," and abused his postcommunist positions as Slovak interior
minister and premier to destroy evidence of his alleged collaboration,
dismiss those who attempted to disclose it, and promote police
officials who agreed to remove files on secret collaborators,
according to an RFE/RL correspondent. No comment on this report
was available from Meciar, but he has denied such allegations
in the past. (Barbara Kroulik)

GERMAN DEFENSE MINISTER IN WARSAW. On 23 March German Defense
Minister Gerhard Stoltenberg began talks in Warsaw on European
security and German-Polish cooperation. After meeting Prime Minister
Olszewski as well as defense and foreign ministers, Jan Parys
and Krzysztof Skubiszewski, Stoltenberg said it was important
for him to hear Poland's judgments and concerns about the situation
in the former USSR. Describing his talks as fruitful, the German
Defense Minister said bilateral ties between Warsaw and Berlin
are developing "very successfully." Skubiszewski said Poland
is interested in closer cooperation with NATO and especially
with Germany, Western and Polish media report. (Wladyslaw Minkiewicz)


CAR DISPUTE DELAYS POLAND'S EC ASSOCIATION ACCORD. A lingering
dispute between the EC and Poland over automobile quotas is hampering
full implementation of Poland's association, an RFE/RL correspondent
reports. Poland had insisted on giving preferential treatment
in auto imports to Western companies prepared to invest in Poland.
France and Britain describe this as discriminatory measure. The
EC Commission's chief Eastern European negotiating expert Pablo
Benavides arrived in Warsaw for talks with Foreign Ministry and
economic officials to try to reach a compromise. Most aspects
of the liberalized trade regimes of the EC association accords
with Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary took effect this month.
(Wladyslaw Minkiewicz)

HUNGARY, ARMENIA ESTABLISH RELATIONS. On 20 March, Hungary established
diplomatic rela-tions with Armenia, Hungarian Foreign Ministry
spokes-man Janos Herman told MTI on 23 March. This brings to
nine the number of Soviet successor states with which Hungary
has diplomatic relations. Preparations are under way to establish
diplomatic relations with Kyrgyzstan and Azerbaijan. (Edith Oltay)


PRINCESS DIANA IN HUNGARY. On 23 March, Britain's Princess Diana,
the wife of British heir to the throne Prince Charles, arrived
for a 24-hour unofficial visit to Hungary, MTI reports. She began
her visit with a tour of the internationally renowned Peto Institute
for disabled children, which has enjoyed Princess Diana's sponsorship
since she first visited Hungary two years ago. She also attended
a performance of the English National Ballet in the company of
Hungarian President Arpad Goncz. (Edith Oltay)

ROMANIAN TRUCK DRIVERS STRIKE. Following the failure two weeks
ago of negotiations on new labor contracts between the unions
and the state, some 60,000 truck drivers began a 48-hour strike
to demand pay raises. Union leader Mihai Vlase said the workers
cannot live on starvation wages and called for the government
to set minimum monthly wages at the equivalent of $90. Romanian
media report that the unions warn that if their demands are not
met the strike could continue for many days. (Mihai Sturdza)


PERSISTENT RIFT IN ROMANIA'S NSF. Bitter tensions between the
competing wings of the National Salvation Front again surfaced
during a plenary meeting on 22 March. Pressure from the attendees
forced NSF leader Petre Roman to put President Ion Iliescu's
candidacy in the next presidential elections to the vote. Of
605 votes, 435 were in favor of Iliescu, but Roman nonetheless
postponed the validation of the vote until the NSF's national
convention on 27 March. Romanian media said on 23 March that
Eugen Dijmarescu, a minister in the former Roman cabinet, has
resigned from the presidency of the Bucharest region NSF organization.
(Mihai Sturdza)

BULGARIAN AGRARIAN PARTY HOLDS CONGRESS. The Bulgarian Agrarian
National Union-United, successor to the former official BANU,
held its extraordinary congress on 21-22 March amid serious disagreements.
As the daily press on 23 March reported, the congress did not
justify its motto "For Agrarian Unity," since members of BANU-Nikola
Petkov, with whom a union is being sought, were not invited and
the unification issue was not even on the agenda. Discussions
centered mainly on the need for renewal and ridding the party
of former communist collaborators. Various proposals for a new
leader were made, but finally the congress reelected as secretary
the former exile Tsenko Barev, who had held this post since last
July. A 116-member administrative council was also elected. (Rada
Nikolaev)

BULGARIAN LABOR CONFLICTS. Miners protesting the government's
intention to halt lead, zinc, and uranium production have repeatedly
been threatening strikes. On 23 March Prime Minister Filip Dimitrov
met with miners from the two labor unions and, according to BTA,
challenged them to submit proposals for ecologically safe recovery
of these ores. Later BTA reported that the miners in the Confederation
of Independent Trade Unions will hold talks with the government
on 25 March, but some might even strike before that date. Also
on 23 March the two labor unions' conflict with the government
escalated when union representatives failed to attend a meeting
on wage controls. The unions accuse the government of failing
to propose an acceptable framework for government-union "social
partnership" to replace the former tripartite commission. (Rada
Nikolaev)

CONTINUED FIGHTING IN BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA. International media
reported on 23 March that fighting continued between Serbs and
Muslims around Gorazde. The dispute began over allocating city
jobs and gasoline ration coupons between members of the two nationalities.
The federal army and republican police are working together to
restore order. Around the Adriatic town of Neum, however, the
federal forces are battling local Croats. There UN and EC representatives
are trying to restore peace, the 24 March Frankfurter Allgemeine
Zeitung says. (Patrick Moore)

COMPROMISE ON LEGAL ORDER IN DISPUTED TERRITORIES? In Zagreb
the head of the Croatian commission dealing with the UN peacekeeping
operation, Milan Ramljak, has suggested that preconflict Yugoslav
federal and Croatian republican legislation could be reintroduced
as legal writ in areas where UN troops are stationed in his republic.
This, he says, would be a compromise between Croatian demands
that current Croatian law be introduced and Serbian insistence
that laws of the present Serbian self-proclaimed governments
be maintained. Ramljak notes that the fundamental law would be
the 1974 Yugoslav constitution, which gives wide berth to republican
legislation. Vjesnik ran the story on 23 March. (Patrick Moore)


KOSOVO ALBANIAN LEADER CALLS FOR COOPERATION WITH MACEDONIA.
That same issue of the Zagreb daily reports on a recent meeting
between Kosovar leader Ibrahim Rugova and Macedonian President
Kiro Gligorov. Rugova says that Serbia has tried to profit from
tension between Macedonia's Slavs and Albanians, and suggests
that Macedonia and Kosovo thwart these moves by promoting open
borders and cooperation between themselves. Kosovo is over 90%
Albanian and borders on areas of Macedonia, where many Albanians,
who account for at least 20% of Macedonia's citizens, live. The
24 March Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung quotes Gligorov as saying
that the "kiss of death" for Yugoslavia came from Serbian President
Slobodan Milosevic's aggressive policies against the Albanians,
the Slovenes, and other peoples of the former federation. (Patrick
Moore) [As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Carla Thorson & Charles Trumbull








The RFE/RL Daily Report is produced by the RFE/RL Research Institute
(a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Inc.) in Munich,
Germany, with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division (NCA). The report is available Monday through Friday,
except holidays, at approximately 0800 US Eastern Time (1400
Central European Time) by fax, post, or e-mail. The report is
also posted daily on the SOVSET computer network.

For-inquiries about specific news items, subscriptions, or additional
copies, please contact:

In USA: Mr. Jon Lodeesen or Mr. Brian Reed RFE/RL, Inc., 1201
Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20036. Telephone: (202)
457-6912 or -6900 fax: (202) 457-6992 or -202-828-8783;

or in Europe:

Mr. David L. Troyanek or Ms. Helga Hofer Publications Department,
RFE/RL Research Institute Oettingenstrasse 67 8000 Munich 22
Telephone: (-49 89) 2102-2631 or -2642 fax: (-49 89) 2102-2648



[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole