I dream my painting, and then I paint my dreams. - Vincent van Gogh
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 160, 23 August 1991



USSR

COUP AFTERMATH--SITUATION IN THE CENTER AND RSFSR

COUP LEADERS IDENTIFIED. In an interview with RFE/RL yesterday
(August 22), RSFSR People's Deputy Vladimir Lysenko, who was
a member of the RSFSR delegation that escorted USSR President
Mikhail Gorbachev back to Moscow, identified four officials who
tried to coerce and threaten the USSR President on August 18.
They were Oleg Baklanov, Anatolii Luk'yanov, Vladimir Kryuchkov,
and Dmitrii Yazov. At his press conference earlier yesterday,
Gorbachev refrained from naming these people who have emerged
as the ringleaders of the coup, rather than Gennadii Yanaev.
Lysenko confirmed that Gorbachev had been particularly hurt by
the role played in the junta by Yazov and Kryuchkov, whom Gorbachev
admitted he had trusted blindly. (Julia Wishnevsky)

MORE ARRESTS TO FOLLOW. Vremya of August22 reported that the
USSR Supreme Soviet Presidium, meeting earlier that day, had
approved the request of the USSR General Prosecutor to lift the
immunity of USSR People's Deputies involved in the coup. They
were two members of the GKChP, Vasilii Starodubtsev and Oleg
Baklanov, as well as Gorbachev's former chief of staff Valerii
Boldin, Politburo member and Party Secretary Oleg Shenin, and
first deputy Defense Minister Valentin Varennikov. Baklanov and
Starodubtsev today are reported to have been arrested, according
to Western agencies. According to Vesti of the same day, the
Moscow City Soviet agreed to lift the immunity of Yurii Prokof'ev,
first secretary of the Moscow Party Committee and a member of
the CPSU Politburo. (Julia Wishnevsky and Dawn Mann)

PAVLOV DISMISSED. Gorbachev formally dismissed Valentin Pavlov
on August 22 as USSR Prime Minister, TASS reported the same day.
No acting prime minister was named, nor was any mention made
of Vitalii Doguzhiev, who took over as acting prime minister
when Pavlov was suddenly taken ill earlier this week. (Dawn Mann)


LUK'YANOV SUSPENDED. Anatolii Luk'yanov, whose involvement in
the abortive coup d'état is being investigated, has been suspended
as chairman of the USSR Supreme Soviet, Radio Rossii reported
August 22. The August 22 session of the USSR Sup-reme Soviet Presidium
was chaired by Ivan Laptev, chairman of the Council of the Union,
who will, together with Rafik Nishanov, chairman of the Council
of Nationalities, temporarily act as head of the Supreme Soviet.
The Presidium also decided that Laptev and Nishanov will chair
the Supreme Soviet session scheduled to meet August 26. Vremya
reported last night that the Presidium had agreed on the agenda
of the next session. Among other things, legislators are to discuss
the role played in the coup by members of the USSR Supreme Soviet.
(Dawn Mann and Julia Wishnevsky)

MOSCOW SOVIET LAUNCHES INVESTIGATIONS. Radio Rossii reported
on August 22 that a working commission charged with investigating
the activity of local officials during the coup was created at
a joint session of the Moscow regional soviet executive committee
and presidium held the same day. Local people's deputies suspected
of complicity will be stripped of their parliamentary immunity,
if necessary. Moscow regional soviet chairman Ivan Cherepanov,
the only deputy to have abstained from an otherwise unanimous
decision to support RSFSR President Boris Yeltsin (adopted on
August 19), will be one of the first to be examined. (Dawn Mann)


CPSU CC TO INVESTIGATE COUP PARTICIPANTS. The CPSU Central Committee
Secretariat yesterday denounced those of its members who participated
in the failed coup, TASS reported. In a report, the Secretariat
claimed that their actions were carried out "secretly" from the
CPSU leadership and did great damage to both the Party and the
country. The Secretariat ordered the Party's Central Control
Commission to investigate CC members who were involved in the
coup and to "adopt appropriate decisions." It is worth recalling,
however, that the CPSU remained silent during the coup until
it was virtually over. (Sallie Wise)

GORBACHEV TO MEET REPUBLICAN LEADERS TODAY. Gorbachev announced
in his address on Soviet television on August 22, and at his
press conference, also carried by Soviet TV yesterday, that he
would be meeting the leaders of nine republics today (August
23) to discuss urgent matters. He told viewers that he had already
discussed future plans with republican leaders, and a new date
for signing the Union treaty was likely to be fixed in the near
future. Gorbachev said that there should be no slippage in the
timetable for adopting a new constitution and a new electoral
law and for holding parliamentary and presidential elections.
He added that events had shown that any drawing out of the transitional
period would be dangerous for democratic transformations. (Ann
Sheehy)

GORBACHEV NAMES TEMPORARY DEFENSE, KGB, AND MVD CHIEFS. Gorbachev
moved quickly August 22 to replace coup leaders who headed three
key institutions: the Ministry of Defense, the KGB, and the MVD,
Soviet media reported yesterday. Chief of the General Staff General
Mikhail Moiseev was named temporary acting Minister of Defense;
Deputy KGB Chairman Leonid Shebarshin was appointed acting KGB
chief; and Deputy Minister of Internal Affairs Vasilii Trushin
was named temporary Internal Affairs Minister. (Sallie Wise)


MOISEEV APPOINTED ACTING DEFENSE MINISTER. Gorbachev's appointment
of Moiseev as a temporary replacement for General Dmitrii Yazov
comes as something from a surprise. The fifty-two year-old Moiseev
has, since his surprise naming as General Staff Chief in December
of 1988, emerged as an outspoken opponent of Gorbachev's domestic
reform policies, and particularly of the liberal media and independence
movements on the periphery. He was an ally of Yazov in Defense
Ministry efforts to slow the military reform process, though
he was not as militant as Yazov on a number of other issues.
He has also criticized "new thinking" in foreign policy although,
of late, he has participated increasingly in arms control negotiations
with the US and appears to be a proponent of the process. The
Moiseev appoint-ment represents more a policy of continuity than
one of change in the Defense Ministry. (Stephen Foye)

MOISEEV'S ROLE IN THE COUP: NON-PARTICIPANT. The appointment
is also surprising because of speculation that Moiseev played
either an active or passive role in the recent coup. US intelligence
sources reportedly believe Moiseev was not involved, and Radio
Rossii on August 22 appeared to confirm that view. On the same
day, Interfax reported that Moiseev had told liberal Interregional
Group member Konstantin Lubenchenko that the coup had taken him
unawares, and that he was disgusted by the actions of its leaders.
According to Radio Moscow, Moiseev said in the August 22 Komsomolskaya
pravda that he had no authority to order troops against the people,
and that the army should not be held responsible for the coup.
(Stephen Foye)

A BEHIND THE SCENES ROLE? According to Radio Moscow and Vesti
of August 22, however, an Izvestia report of that day casts suspicion
on this interpretation. The report refers to a conversation with
the Moscow Military District Chief of Staff, a General Lieutenant
Zolotov, held several days before the coup was launched. The
context of the conversation is not clear in the Radio report,
but apparently Zolotov was asked if the military had formulated
plans for seizing various buildings, and he replied that "oral"
orders had been given by Deputy Defense Minister Vladislav Achalov,
while coded telegrams to the same effect had been issued by Moiseev.
Vesti interpreted the report to mean that during the coup a troop
division had been deployed to Moscow on the secret orders of
Moiseev. (Stephen Foye)

WHO IS ACHALOV? Colonel General Vladislav Achalov, the former
commander of Soviet Airborne Troops, was appointed to a newly
created Deputy Defense Ministry post in December of last year
with "unspecified responsibilities." In the Izvestia article,
Zolotov identifies him as "Deputy Defense Minister for Emergency
Situations." This designation would fit some of Achalov's earlier
press statements on his new duties, and would also be consistent
with his earlier profile as Airborne Forces Commander, where
he was active in the deployment of troops in the Baltic republics
and in other trouble spots. While his name has not been mentioned
as a conspirator, he seems a likely candidate to have been involved.
(Stephen Foye)

GOVOROV OUSTED, NEW CIVIL DEFENSE CHIEF APPOINTED. According
to Western agencies August22, Gorbachev's first official act
upon arriving in Moscow was to fire the Deputy Defense Minister
for Civil Defense, Army General Vladimir Govorov. Govorov has
not been mentioned as a conspirator, and reportedly was being
transferred to another post rather than being arrested. He was
appointed in 1986, and is a USSR People's Deputy from the Chechen-Ingush
ASSR. Colonel General Boris Pyankov has been named to replace
Govorov. Commander of the Siberian Military District since the
spring of 1989, the fifty-six year-old Pyankov is also a USSR
People's Deputy (from Novosibirsk). He is a former First Deputy
Commander of the Odessa Military District, and subsequently served
in Afghanistan. (Stephen Foye)

YELTSIN ORDERS ARMY'S PARTY CELLS DISBANDED. Yeltsin issued a
decree on August 22 that ordered the disbanding of Communist
Party cells in all army units located in the RSFSR, Western news
agencies reported yesterday. "Party leaders in the armed forces
directly supported the coup d'état and took part in it," the
decree reportedly said. Earlier fears that Yeltsin would ban
Party cells in the army is thought to be one of the reasons that
Monday's coup attempt was launched. (Stephen Foye)

OFFICERS WANT COMMANDERS OUSTED. TASS reported on August 22 that
army, KGB, and Internal Ministry soldiers and officers who had
defended Yeltsin have sent the RSFSR President an appeal to remove
those high-ranking officers participating in the coup. The appeal
also called for immediate removal of Party cells from the military,
KGB, and MVD. (Stephen Foye)

WHAT'S THE ROLE OF NIKOLAI STOLYAROV? Soviet TV viewers could
recognize Nikolai Stolyarov, reformist chairman of the RSFSR
CP Control Commission, among members of the RSFSR delegation
that accompanied Gorbachev back to Moscow. Apart from his position
in the RSFSR Communist Party, Stolyarov is rumored to be proposed
for the leadership of the Democratic Communist Party of Russia
and may be a personal friend of Vice President Aleksandr Rutskoi.
Stolyarov wore his uniform of Soviet Army Colonel. Was he that
because he had defended the Russian White House as a military
man or because of his role as a Party reformer? (Julia Wishnevsky)


PRAVDA CONDEMNS POSITION OF POLITBURO. The working collective
of Pravda issued a statement, carried in the newspaper's issue
for August 23, saying that it [the collective] demands the transformation
of the daily into an organ of all Communists of the country.
The statement said that the newspaper should cease to be the
main organ of the CPSU CC, since the CPSU leadership (including
the Central Committee and the Politburo) failed to take a principled
stand during the coup. The statement proposed discussing the
issue at the 29th Party Congress, TASS reported the evening of
August 22. (Vera Tolz)

TASS DENIES THAT IT RECEIVED GKChP DOCUMENTS IN ADVANCE. On August
22 TASS denied an allegation, reported in Nezavisimaya gazeta
the same day and repeated by RSFSR TV, to the effect that the
management of the main government agency received all the GKChP's
main documents as early as the night of August 17-18. TASS said
that in fact Deputy Director General of TASS Gennadii Shishkin
was summoned to the Kremlin at 5:00 a.m. on August19 and was
ordered to distribute the material at 6:00 a.m. TASS's Director
General Lev Spiridonov was on vacation at the time. (Vera Tolz)


CENTRAL TV EMPLOYEES DEMAND DEPAR-TIFICATION. Many journalists
working at Central Soviet TV held a meeting on August 22 to support
their demand for the prompt implementation within their organization
of Yeltsin's decree on departification. RSFSR TV reported that
the journalists also demanded an investigation of the role in
the coup of the head of Central TV, Leonid Kravchenko, and his
deputies. The journalists also demanded that Central TV be subordinate
to "a Council set up of the country's prominent people." Yesterday,
Yeltsin stated that until the situation in the country is clarified,
he has transferred central TV to the jurisdiction of the Russian
Federation. (Vera Tolz)

KRAVCHENKO IS OUT! TSN reported this morning (August 23) that
it had investigated contradictory reports on who is in charge
of Soviet radio and TV at the moment. RSFSR TV had reported yesterday
that although Yeltsin issued a decree ordering Kravchenko's dismissal,
he was still performing his duties. (Kravchenko is not subordinate
to Yeltsin and therefore he apparently ignored the decree.) TSN
quoted First Deputy Chairman of the State TV and Radio Company
Vitalii Lazutkin as saying that he, Lazutkin, is presently serving
as the company's acting chairman in accordance with Yeltsin's
decision. (Julia Wishnevsky and Vera Tolz)

IZVESTIA STAFF VOTES TO SACK EDITORS. Journalists voted to sack
top editors of Izvestia for their collaboration with the plotters
of the coup. Interfax reported the news on August 22 and Izvestia
itself on August 23. The staff of the newspaper voted to sack
editor-in-chief Nikolai Efimov and two editorial board members,
Sevruk and Mamleev. (The staff sharply protested when the three
men were appointed.) The newspaper's staff also voted to dissociate
it from the USSR Supreme Soviet, whose Presidium is the official
founder of the paper. (Vera Tolz)

RSFSR TV CRITICIZES SOME OF GORBACHEV'S STATEMENTS. In his remark
at his press conference yesterday about his adherence to the
socialist course, Gorbachev demonstrated that he remains faithful
to his traditional stand, RSFSR TV's Vesti news program observed
August 22. Vesti also criticized Gorbachev for his positive comment
about Politburo member Aleksandr Dzasokhov's stand during the
coup. In fact, Vesti emphasized, it was Dzasokhov who demanded
the demotion of Central TV commentator Sergei Medvedev, who expressed
support for Yeltsin on the Vremya newscast on the first day of
the coup. (Vera Tolz)

WESTERN ECONOMIC AID RESTORED. In the wake of the abortive coup,
the USSR Government sent an appeal to its Western trade partners
to refrain from all steps that would curtail economic relations,
a German government spokesman disclosed August 22. Later that
day, US President George Bush declared that the US is lifting
its freeze on economic help to the Soviet Union (although nobody
seemed to know what programs had been legally frozen). The European
Community reinstated its billion-dollar aid package. The Australian
government restored a $390 million line of credit to the USSR,
and Japan signified its readiness to renew an offer of $100million
in loans to the Soviet Union for emergency food purchases. (Keith
Bush)

WESTERN ASSISTANCE TO BE STEPPED UP? German Foreign Minister
Hans-Dietrich Genscher said Western nations must give Moscow
large-scale aid to prevent another coup attempt. British Prime
Minister John Major promised that he will press the G-7 nations
to speed up help for Soviet economic reforms. Austrian Chancellor
Franz Vranitzky declared that more help for the USSR was necessary
and that it should not be delayed until the USSR completes its
transition to the market. The European Community signalled that
it may push for quicker Soviet integration into international
financial institutions. And the EBRD debated whether to raise
its limit of $126 million in loans to the USSR over the forthcoming
three years. (Keith Bush)

IMF ASSOCIATE STATUS FOR REPUBLICS? TASS of August 22 cites the
Japanese Kyodo news agency to the effect that the IMF may shortly
be asked to grant the individual union republics of the USSR
special associate status in the IMF and World Bank, in view of
their greater influence in the wake of the abortive coup. This
status, which was proposed by the G-7 summit members for the
USSR as a whole, would give the republics access to technical
assistance and advice but not to funding. A Japanese deputy foreign
minister is reported to be en route to the US and Western Europe
to discuss the proposal. (Keith Bush)

PLANS FOR PAPAL VISIT TO USSR WILL GO AHEAD. Western agencies
on August 22 cited Vatican spokesman Joaquin Navarro as saying
that it is more important than ever for Pope John Paul II to
visit the USSR. He added that the present crisis in the USSR
will not affect plans for a papal trip to USSR which might occur
next year. (Oxana Antic)

SITUATION IN THE BALTIC STATES

VILNIUS TV PROGRAMS RETURN. After more than 7 months of occupation,
the Soviet army left the Vilnius TV studios and transmission
tower on August 22, Radio Independent Lithuania reported. As troops
began to withdraw from other, more recently seized installations,
Lithuanian Supreme Council Chairman Vytautas Landsbergis contacted
Moiseev to inquire about the possibility of returning buildings
seized in January. Moiseev promised to call Landsbergis back,
but did not. Instead, Landsbergis asked the newly-appointed commander
of the Vilnius garrison Colonel Valery Frolov to begin the withdrawal,
and he did. Broadcasts from the TV facilities began later that
day. (Gytis Liulevicius)

LITHUANIAN COMMUNIST PARTY OUTLAWED. The Lithuanian parliament
banned the Lithuanian Communist Party on August 22, Radio Independent
Lithuania reported August 23. The resolution cites the Party
as having attempted to overthrow the government in January, and
having followed the USSR coup leaders' orders on Lithuanian territory.
The parliament recognized that "illegal Lithuanian Communist
Party activity continues," and decided to "prohibit such activity
on the territory of the Republic of Lithuania." The resolution
calls for obtaining documentary material from the USSR relating
to the Lithuanian Communist Party. The Lithuanian prosecutor-general
is to investigate the "legal responsibility" of people who participated
in the January events or the August coup. (Gytis Liulevicius)


COMMUNIST PARTY PROPERTY. In accompanying legislation, the parliament
passed a law "on the seizure of Lithuanian Communist Party property,"
Radio Independent Lithuania reported August 23. "The property
of the Lithuanian Communist Party and the CPSU illegally functioning
on the territory of the Republic of Lithuania is transferred
without compensation to the Republic of Lithuania," according
to the law, and anyone attempting to obstruct its execution
will be prosecuted.Early that morning the Lithuanian authorities
hadalready taken control over the Lithuanian Communist Party
Central Committee building in Vilnius. (Gytis Liulevicius)

DECISION ON SOVIET ARMED FORCES. On August 22 the Lithuanian
parliament passed a decision on the military presence in Lithuania,
Radio Independent Lithuania reported August 23. It demanded that
the USSR government fulfill its pledges to increase trust with
Lithuania and remove as soon as possible all its army structures,
paratrooper units, KGB and MVD troops from the republic. The
Lithuanian government was authorized to implement immediately
the dissolution of the KGB and MVD units and to take over all
documents and other archives of the NKVD, MVD, and KGB on their
activities in Lithuania. The decision also authorized the Lithuanian
Prosecutor to conduct investigations on the criminal activities
of these units made after March 11, 1990. (Saulius Girnius)

ESTONIA TO PUNISH COUP SUPPORTERS. Estonia's Prime Minister has
ordered Estonia's Prosecutor General to start criminal proceedings
against those in Estonia who supported the coup "in words and
deeds." According to the Estonian Foreign Ministry on August
23, Savisaar signed the order yesterday to sack the heads of
several all-Union controlled factories, to punish those municipal
leaders in primarily Russian-speaking northeastern Estonia who
supported the coup, to close down the Soviet Navy-Intermovement
radio station "Nadezhda," which broadcast in support of the coup,
and to order local governments to take similar actions. The government
order also created a number of special investigative commissions
to look into the role of the military, various political parties
and work collectives in supporting the coup. Savisaar also told
reporters on August 22 that Estonia would demand the dismissal
of military commanders who supported the coup, would seek an
end to all KGB activities in the republic, and would begin work
toward a treaty governing the stationing of troops there. (Riina
Kionka)

ESTONIAN MINISTER SUSPICIOUS. Estonia's Minister without portfolio
responsible for Nationality Relations Artur Kuznetsov is suspicious
of Gorbachev's role in this week's putsch. Kuznetsov told Western
agencies August 22 that he could not understand why Gorbachev,
as Chief of the Soviet armed services, was unable to rally the
military around him or why the Soviet President's personal security
failed to act. "It is clear to me that this was no authentic
putsch," Kuznetsov said. Kuznetsov's remarks came before Gorbachev's
press conference on the evening of August 22, in which he explained
the circumstances of his three-day detention. (Riina Kionka)


LATVIAN LEADER FEARS OMON ATTACK. Deputy Chairman of the Latvian
Supreme Council Andrejs Krastins told World Federation of Free
Latvians representative Roberts Dambergs in Canadaon August
22 that OMON units may be preparing to attack the Latvian government
and Supreme Council. He said that OMON troops in Latvia had been
acting as if no one were in control since the coup attempt in
Moscow failed. Krastins called on USSR President Gorbachev to
prevent any plans for an attack, according to a WFFL report
of August 22. Radio Riga reported on August 23 that Soviet war
veterans were urging pedestrians in Riga to support OMON and
noted that rumors were being spread that somebody was planning
to blow up the OMON bases. (Dzintra Bungs)

LATVIAN COMMUNIST PARTY DECLARED TO BE OUTSIDE THE LAW. Voting
96 to 2, the Latvian Supreme Council declared this morning (August
23) that the Latvian Communist Party was unconstitutional in
Latvia. The deputies also decided that LCP property must be returned
to its rightful owners--the people of Latvia; to start legal
proceedings against those LCP members who had actively support
the coup in Moscow; to order all banks in Latvia to freeze LCP
accounts; and to transfer party documents and archives to the
State Archive. Radio Riga also reported on August 23 that local
LCP organizations and organizations subordinate to the party
had started either to remove their archives or to burn them.
The Supreme Council appointed a committee, headed by Deputy Eduards
Berklavs, to look after the question on party property and archives.
(Dzintra Bungs)

LATVIAN SUPREME COUNCIL DISCUSSES FUTURE OF KGB. The Latvian
Supreme Council today started to discuss a proposal, drafted
by Deputy Juris Bojars, to place the Latvian SSR KGB organization
under the jurisdiction of the Republic of Latvia until such time
that the issue is completely resolved. Present at the session
was the republican KGB chairman Edmunds Johansons, who said that
he could comment on the issues involved in detail only in a closed
session of the Supreme Council. The deputies are now meeting
in a closed session to hear what Johansons has to say. (Dzintra
Bungs)

ESTONIA SEEKS DIPLOMATIC RECOGNITION. Estonia's Foreign Minister
Lennart Meri is making a formal appeal to all CSCE countries
to recognize Estonia's declaration of independence. The Estonian
Foreign Ministry reported on August 22 that Meri has begun sending
identical appeals for recognition, along with copies of the Estonian
Supreme Council's August 20 declaration of full independence,
to all 34 CSCE member countries. Meri, who traveled to Helsinki
with orders to form a government-in-exile if necessary when the
coup began on Monday, plans to return to Tallinn today, August
23. (Riina Kionka)

ESTONIA RECOGNIZES LATVIAN INDEPE-NDENCE. Chairman of the Estonian
Supreme Council Arnold Ruutel sent a message to the Latvian Supreme
Council on August 22 saying that Estonia is ready to restore
diplomatic relations with its southern neighbor. "The Republic
of Estonia recognizes the restoration of the Republic of Latvia
as an independent state and as a subject of international law,
and considers the legitimate power on the territory of the Republic
of Latvia to be solely vested in the Supreme Council of the Republic
of Latvia and its bodies of government," the statement said.
ETA reported the declaration on August 22. (Riina Kionka)

GORBUNOVS ASKS FOR INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION OF BALTIC STATES.
Addressing the North American, Eastern and Western European parliamentarians
taking part in the conference on "The Baltic States in the New
Europe," Latvian Supreme Council Chairman Anatolijs Gorbunovs
said that the conference was not called merely to observe the
anniversary of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, but rather to seek
a solution to the injustices stemming from the pact. He asked
the participants to work actively for the de facto and de jure
recognition of the Baltic States by their own countries. Despite
the uncertain situation in the Baltics and the USSR during the
past days, the conference started, as planned, in Tallinn on
August 21, moved to Riga on August 22, and will end in Vilnius
today (August 23), reported Radio Riga on August 22. (Dzintra
Bungs)

SENTIMENT FOR RECOGNITION OF BALTICS GROWS. On August 22 Denmark's
Minister of Foreign Affairs Uffe Ellemann-Jensen discussed with
his Latvian counterpart Janis Jurkans procedures for Denmark's
recognition of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania as independent
states, reported Western agencies that day. Copenhagen, reportedly,
would establish ties with the Baltic states once their independence
has been agreed with the USSR government. Australian Prime Minister
Bob Hawke told the press on August 23 that while his country
has not yet recognized the independence declarations of Estonia,
Latvia, and Lithuania, such action now was "inevitable." (Dzintra
Bungs)

PRESSURE INCREASES IN GERMANY TOO. Pressure for recognition of
the Baltic declarations of independence is growing in Germany.
Chairman of the Free Democratic Party Otto Graf Lambsdorff told
the Deutsche Welle on August 22 that there could be no return
to the old power structures in the Soviet Union, and that the
West would have to reconsider its position on the Baltic states
in the wake of the failed coup. Lambsdorff said that it was not
only the people of Moscow and Leningrad who went into the streets
and opposed the coup, but those of Tallinn, Riga and Vilnius
as well. The same day, German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich
Genscher said the attempted coup had moved the Baltic States
closer to independence, and again urged independence negotiations
between the Balts and Moscow. Genscher did not mention the repeated
refusal of the USSR to conduct bona fide talks with the Baltic
states since last year. (Riina Kionka)

SITUATION IN THE REPUBLICS

NAZARBAEV LEAVES POLITBURO AND CC. Kazakhstan's President Nursultan
Nazarbaev, outraged at an attempt to get him, as a Politburo
member, to sign a CPSU Central Committee declaration supporting
the GKChP, has resigned from both the Politburo and the CPSU
CC, according to a TASS report of August 22. He declared that
the CPSU CC Secretariat had thoroughly discredited itself during
the crisis by sending out documents indicating support for the
coup, and that he had rejected an attempt to call a CC plenum
on August 20. Nazarbaev also announced that he intends to propose
to the republican CP that it break with the CPSU. (Bess Brown)


KAZAKHSTAN DEPOLITICIZES. At the same time that he resigned from
his posts in the central structure of the CPSU, Nazarbaev issued
a decree ordering the immediate cessation of the activities of
existing organizations of political parties and mass movements
in the republican prosecutor's office, law enforcement and security
agencies, judicial agencies including the courts, and the customs
service. The decree requires that law enforcement officials follow
only the laws of Kazakhstan and prohibits discrimination on grounds
of political activity. Nazarbaev's decree was reported by TASS
on August 22; the previous day, Kirgiz president Askar Akaev
issued an even wider-ranging depoliticization decree. (Bess Brown)


AKAEV'S ATTACK ON CP CONTINUES. The central television news show
TSN has just reported (August23) that Kyrgyzstan's president
Askar Akaev has followed up his August 21 decree banning Party
organizations from state agencies by nationalizing the building
of the republican Communist Party. Akaev has been battling the
strongly anti-democratic republican Party organization since
his election last winter. The failure of the Moscow coup provides
him with an opportunity to settle scores with hardline Communists
in his own republic. (Bess Brown)

KARIMOV LEAVES POLITBURO. Not to be outdone by Nazarbaev, Uzbekistan's
President Islam Karimov has also resigned from the CPSU Politburo,
according to a TASS announcement of August 23. A statement of
the republican CP buro in support of Karimov's decision explained
that it was motivated by "the cowardly and unprincipled position
of the orthodox part of the leadership of the CPSU Central Committee
and Secretariat," which not only failed to condemn the anti-constitutional
actions of the GKChP but tried to "disorient" members of the
Uzbek CP and get them to support the coup. (Bess Brown)

UKRAINE TO CONSIDER NATIONAL GUARD, CONTROL OVER ARMY. Ukraine's
Parliamentary leadership met in Kiev August 22 and called for
its own National Guard and control over the Soviet army on its
territory, reported the official Ukraina News Service that same
day. The Parliamentary leadership, chaired by Ukrainian Supreme
Soviet Chairman Leonid Kravchuk, called for a special session
of Parliament on August 24 to discuss strengthening Ukraine's
drive for sovereignty. The issue of Ukraine minting its own currency
will once again be discussed at the meeting. (Natalie Melnyczuk)


TRANSCAUCASIAN LEADERS' REACTIONS TO COUP. Armenian President
Levon Ter-Petrossyan told reporters in Erevan yesterday that
Gorbachev facilitated this week's coup by making too many concessions
to hard-liners. He was pleased that the coup had failed, but
said the world should not confer on Gorbachev "laurels that only
Boris Yeltsin deserves," Radio Erevan reported August 22. In
a statement relayed by the Georgian presidential office to RFE/RL
August 22, Georgian President Gamsakhurdia called upon the West
to recognize the independence of those republics that have refused
to sign the Union treaty. Gamsakhurdia said that the authorities
in South Ossetia and Abkhazia, both of which oppose Georgian
secession, had supported the coup. Azerbaijani President Mutalibov
sent a telegram of congratulation to Yeltsin, Radio Moscow reported
August 22. (Liz Fuller)

ARRESTS IN AZERBAIJAN. Radio Rossii reported August 22 that the
leaders of the democratic movement in Azerbaijan had been arrested,
and that a demonstration in support of Gorbachev and Yeltsin
had been brutally suppressed. (Liz Fuller)

MOLDAVIA SUSPENDS REPUBLICAN CP PRESS, TASS OFFICE. The Moldavian
Parliament's Presidium issued a decree August 22 suspending publication
of the Communist press organs in the republic that supported
the Moscow coup. The decree suspends, effective immediately,
the Moldavian CP dailies Cuvantul and Sovetskaya Moldova and
a number of other communist dailies and weeklies, including those
of the would-be Dniester and Gagauz SSRs. The Presidium found
that these publications printed the GKChP's decisions and messages
of support to the junta, and misinformed about resistance to
the coup. Editors of the publications affected may apply for
registration of new publications in accordance with republican
legislation. The decree also suspends until further notice the
activity of the TASS office in Moldavia, accused of spreading
disinformation favorable to the plotters. (Vladimir Socor)

MOLDAVIA EXTENDS HELPING HAND TO MOSCOW LIBERAL PRESS. Banned
by the GKChP during the days of the coup, Moskovskie novosti
and Nezavisimaya gazeta were invited by two weeklies in Kishinev
to publish there. As a result, the current issues of MN and NG
are being published in the Moldavian capital by Glasul Natiunii
and Molodezh Moldavii, respectively. (Vladimir Socor)

MOLDAVIAN VICTORY RALLY. A resister from the first hour, the
Moldavian leadership made a triumphant appearance August 22 at
a farewell rally for tens of thousands of rural volunteers, headed
for home after helping protect Kishinev against the threat of
military intervention during the days of the coup. Thanking the
volunteers for their services, President Mircea Snegur, Parliament
Chairman Alexandru Mosanu, and Prime Minister Valeriu Muravschi
also urged them not to retaliate against collaborators with the
GKChP but to let the judicial process take its course. Snegur
vowed "to continue the work of establishing genuine democracy
and preparing the conditions for the real independence of the
Republic of Moldavia," Moldovapres reported. (Vladimir Socor)

USSR AND BALTIC STATES--OTHER NEWS MATYUKHIN ON UNION TREATY.
The chairman of the RSFSR Central Bank, Georgii Matyukhin, told
a London press conference August 22 that the planned Union Treaty
is an ineffective compromise and must be reworked, Western agencies
reported that day. He was quoted as saying: "I don't know why
Yeltsin decided to sign it. He must have been afraid of the kind
of events that occurred." Matyukhin described the idea that republics
could leave the USSR's integrated economic system as an illusion.
He thereby added his voice to the position held by USSR Gosbank
Chairman Viktor Gerashchenko and to recommendations made by the
IMF, EBRD, and other institutions. (Keith Bush)

MATYUKHIN ON THE USSR'S FOREIGN DEBT. Matyukhin told the same
press conference that the Soviet debt service ratio was not excessive,
but that a short-term liquidity problem existed because half
of the total debt had a maturity of less than one year. He offered
four solutions to the liquidity problem: a rescheduling of maturities;
debt for equity swaps associated with privatization of state
enterprises; the use of gold as collateral for loans; and the
issue of long-term government bonds to substitute for debt which
would be convertible to hard currency. Matyukhin stated that
the RSFSR is prepared to take on 55-60% of the USSR's total foreign
debt, which he estimated at $60 billion. (Keith Bush)

NEW PRIME MINISTER APPOINTED IN GEORGIA. Georgian President Zviad
Gamsakhurdia has appointed former deputy Minister of Culture
Vissarion Gugushvili acting Georgian Prime Minister, Interfax
reported August 22. Gugushvili replaces Tengiz Sigua who resigned
August 17. (Liz Fuller)

FLAMING BALTIC WAY. People in Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania
are preparing to observe the 52nd anniversary of the Molotov-Ribbentrop
Pact this evening (August 23) by lighting bonfires along a path
from Vilnius through Riga to Tallinn. The first fire is to be
lit in the vicinity of the TV towers in Vilnius at 8:00 p.m..
The fires are to be extinguished one hour later, and participants
will then proceed to meetings held in local centers, reported
Radio Riga on August 23. (Dzintra Bungs)




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