It is easier to love humanity than to love one's neighbor. - Eric Hoffer
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 126, 05 July 1991



BALTIC STATES



NO SEPARATE MFN FOR BALTIC STATES. The US will not exclude the
Baltic states from the pending US-Soviet trade agreement, according
to an unnamed State Department official cited in an RFE/RL correspondent's
report in Washington on July 4. The official said there was no
practical way to extend MFN to the USSR without also extending
it to the Baltic states, but stressed that this move will not
change the longstanding US policy of non-recognition. The US
position was articulated last week in Washington to some Baltic
representatives, and was also distributed as a non-paper to the
foreign ministries in the three Baltic capitals by the US Consul
in Leningrad on July 1, according to RFE/RL Estonian Service
interviews. (Riina Kionka)

SAVISAAR IN SIBERIA. Estonian Prime Minister Edgar Savisaar reportedly
traveled to Siberia on July 4 to conclude a series of economic
agreements with Siberian towns and oblasts. Savisaar, accompanied
by Minister of Material Resources Aleksander Sikkal, was also
to have met with local Estonians--most of whom remained in the
East after having been deported there in the 1940s--to discuss
how best to commemorate the memory of those deportees who died
in Siberia. Plans for Savisaar's trip were reported on July 1
by Estonian Radio. (Riina Kionka)

PRICE HIKES IN ESTONIA. The cost of food rose again when food
prices were fully deregulated July 1, Paevaleht reported the
next day. The price hikes did not precipitate protests anywhere
in Estonia except for Narva, where the ECP (CPSU platform) Central
Committee secretariat adopted a resolution laying the blame for
any future social unrest on the Estonian Supreme Council. (Riina
Kionka)

KRASTINS REFUTES CLAIM OF LATVIAN SUPPORT FOR UNION TREATY. Deputy
Chairman of the Latvian Supreme Council Andrejs Krastins told
Radio Riga on July 2 that claims made in an article, published
in Izvestia of July 1, about Baltic representatives' support
for the new USSR Union treaty were unfounded. He noted that there
are no representatives of the Republic of Latvia to the USSR
Supreme Soviet and that if a deputy from the Latvian SSR to the
Soviet legislature has expressed an opinion on the Union treaty,
then that is his personal view. Krastins stressed that Latvia
is an independent state and, as such, does not intend to endorse
the new Union treaty. (Dzintra Bungs)

LATVIANS DISAPPOINTED OVER DELAY OF LATVIAN-USSR CONSULTATIONS.
Deputy Prime Minister Ilmars Bisers told Diena on July 3 that
the Latvian delegation was disappointed about the postponement
of the consultations. The Latvians sent a telegram to Moscow
asking for official confirmation that the consultations had been
postponed. Bisers said that news of the delay came unofficially:
Soviet delegation member Valentin Ogorok had spoken about it
with the Latvian representation chief Janis Peters. Radio Riga
reported on July 4 that Bisers had flown to Moscow to talk with
Soviet delegation head Vladimir Velichko about resuming the consultations.
(Dzintra Bungs)

SOVIET SOLDIERS' ASSOCIATION WARNS LATVIAN GOVERNMENT. Diena
reported on July 2 about a statement issued by the coordination
center of the Baltic Soldiers' Association claiming that the
present government of Latvia is leading the republic to an international
crisis and economic collapse. The Soviet soldiers' organization
also said that it is concerned about efforts restore "the Fascist
regime of Ulmanis" in Latvia and warned: "Those who cherish Fascist
ideas [should understand] that for the time being there are still
soldiers of the Soviet Army and USSR citizens on Latvia territory."
The statement said that all issues related to the presence of
Soviet Army and Soviet monuments in Latvia should be dealt with
at the governmental level and concluded: "Working people of Latvia,
the army is against bloodshed." (Dzintra Bungs)

REPLACEMENTS FOR SOVIET GENERALS IN VILNIUS. Moscow Radio reported
on July 2 that Colonel Aleksandr Gorkushin will replace Major
General Vladimir Uskhopchik as commander of the Soviet military
garrison in Vilnius. Colonel Nikolai Mironenko will replace Major
General Aleksandr Zhitnikov as the commander of the USSR MVD
troops in Lithuania. Mironenko will not be in charge of the OMON
troops in Vilnius; they will continue to be under the control
of Colonel Nikolai Goncharenko, who is stationed in Riga and
heads a group coordinating the work of the OMOM branches in Vilnius
and Riga. (Saulius Girnius)

LITHUANIA SUPPORTS SLOVENIA'S INDEPENDENCE. On July 3 the Lithuanian
Supreme Council adopted a declaration supporting Slovenia's bid
for independence, Radio Independent Lithuania reported that day.
The Council expressed its solidarity with Slovenia and protested
against the armed agression of the Yugoslav military that began
on June 27. The parliament of Slovenia had sent an appeal to
the Supreme Council that noted that the people of Slovenia were
united in their try for independence and were ready to defend
their freedom from military aggression. (Saulius Girnius)

LITHUANIA DENIES ASKING NORWAY TO PRINT MONEY. In a July 3 news
release, the Lithuanian government information bureau denied
previous Western reports that Lithuania sought to print its money
in Norway. "An agreement to print Lithuanian money was signed
in 1990 with foreign companies," the news release said. The terse
statement failed to mention where or when the new currency will
actually be printed, only emphasizing that the Lithuanian government
did not ask Norway to print money. (Gytis Liulevicius)



USSR-ALL-UNION TOPICS


SHEVARDNADZE QUITS CPSU. Former USSR Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze has resigned from the CPSU, RSFSR television and
Western agencies reported July 4. Shevardnadze sent his resignation
letter to the CPSU Central Control Commission, which has initiated
disciplinary actions against him in connection with his support
for the creation of the Movement for Democratic Reforms. In his
letter, a copy of which Shevardnadze forwarded to Interfax, he
wrote that the Party apparatus' attempt to punish him amounted
to a return "to repressive methods of suppressing alternative
views." Shevardnadze also said that he knows of a "campaign of
slander" being planned against himself and other people who signed
the July 1 statement on the creation of the movement. (Vera Tolz)


YELTSIN SUPPORTS NEW POLITICAL MOVEMENT. RSFSR President Boris
Yeltsin said he would like to see the newly created Movement
for Democratic Reforms develop as a party, not as a broad political
movement. In an interview with RSFSR TV on July 4, Yeltsin said
that those who want to participate in the movement should leave
the CPSU. (With Shevarndadze's resignation from the Party, only
four of the nine officials who signed the July 1 statement are
still members of the CPSU. They are Aleksandr Yakovlev, Arkadii
Vol'sky, Aleksandr Rutskoi and Ivan Silaev.) (Vera Tolz)

PREPARATIONS FOR GORBACHEV'S LONDON TRIP. With less than two
weeks to go until USSR President Mikhail Gorbachev's presentation
to the post G-7 summit meeting, the Soviet media carry much conjecture,
speculation, and some disinformation about the nature and content
of his mission. Presidential advisor Evgenii Primakov told Izvestia
July 4 that the president will offer "conceptual propositions,"
rather than a program. Yet several other reports name, inter
alia, Abalkin, Aganbegyan, Martynov, and Ozerelev as members
of the team that is furiously working on a synthesis of the Pavlov,
Yavlinsky, and Attali draft plans. This synthesis will then be
reworked and stamped with Gorbachev's own input. (Keith Bush)


PAVLOV DOES HIS THING. At a press conference in Moscow on July
3, USSR Prime Minister Valentin Pavlov stated: "Gorbachev is
not working on any program, especially a new program for his
trip to London, at least not that I know of...We must fulfill
one program first [i.e., his own anticrisis program]. It is high
time we stop producing programs and start implementing them."
An unnamed Gorbachev aide told The Los Angeles Times of July
4 that Pavlov's pronouncements had surprised and annoyed the
president. Referring to the prime minister, this offical said:
"We have a loose cannon rolling about. We are either going to
have to lash him down or drop him overboard." (Keith Bush)

CABINET DISCUSSES BUDGET CRISIS. The USSR Cabinet of Ministers
met July 4 to discuss the country's critical financial position
and the implementation of the measures agreed upon at the July
2 economic conference. USSR Minister of Finance Vladimir Orlov
warned that the total budget deficit could rise to 280-300 billion
rubles by the end of the year if present trends continue, Radio
Mayak reported July 4. USSR Prime Minister Pavlov noted that
enterprises have reduced their production but practically doubled
their profits. He claimed to have received a note from the Main
Administration for Production of State Badges, Coins, and Orders
which stated that unless inflation rates are lowered, it would
be unable to print enough money. (Keith Bush)

CENTRAL COMMITTEE TO MEET. At a meeting held on July 3, the CPSU
Politburo decided to convene a meeting of the Central Committee
on July 25. The topic of discussion will be the draft Party program,
Radio Moscow reported July 3. The Politburo also issued a resolution
stating that delay in the adoption of a new Union treaty would
lead to the further destabilization of the country. (Dawn Mann)


GORBACHEV BLASTS PARTY CONSERVATIVES. In a speech reported in
Pravda July 4, Gorbachev said that if conservatives within the
Party continue to "cannibalize" it from within, the Party will
"lose all future political battles and elections," The Times
and The Guardian reported the same day. Commenting on the various
platforms within the CPSU, Gorbachev said that arbitrarily "fixing
such labels goes beyond any boundary of Party, civil, or even
human morality." (Dawn Mann)

"BOLSHEVIK PLATFORM" TO MEET. The "Bolshevik Platform" of the
CPSU will hold an all-Union meeting in Minsk on July 14, Radio
Rossii reported July 2. The "Bolshevik Platform" seeks Gorbachev's
ouster and the repeal of almost all of the reform legislation
passed since 1985. Novosti July 2 said the invitation to the
meeting, which was sent to members of the newly-formed "Stalin"
group (see Daily Report, No. 125), is signed by Nina Andreeva,
the leader of Yedinstvo ("Unity"). Andreeva told a Western journalist
on July 3 that Yedinstvo has 35,000 supporters but most are afraid
to admit it for fear of persecution. She denied Soviet reports
that the group wants to leave the CPSU to form the "Party of
Bolsheviks and Stalinists," adding, "the central press either
hush us up or distort what we say." (Dawn Mann)

MARXIST-WORKERS PARTY FORMED. Radio Rossiya reported July 2 that
a new Marxist-Workers Party has been formed in 120 cities across
the USSR. The party is patterned after the radical Red Guards
who enforced the Cultural Revolution in China in the 1960s and
early 1970s. According to Radio Rossiya, most of the party's
members are young workers who reject market economics as threatening
"centralist dictatorship." (Dawn Mann)

RADIO ROSSII MORE DANGEROUS THAN RADIO LIBERTY. Speaking at a
press conference during a recent visit to Smolensk, the chairman
of the USSR State TV and Radio Broadcasting Company, Leonid Kravchenko,
sharply attacked the RSFSR media, Kuranty reported July 5. The
newspaper of the Moscow city Soviet quoted Kravchenko as saying
that he regards Radio Rossii as being "most dangerous." Kravchenko
said the stations does more harm to Communist ideology than Radio
Liberty or the Voice of America. (Vera Tolz)

INDEPENDENT WRITERS' UNION CREATED. Interviewed on Russian television
2 July, Yevgenii Yevtushenko announced the creation of a new
writers' union, calling the old one obsolescent. The new union
would be completely non-ideological in character, he said, and
would accept writers regardless of their political or literary
persuasions. It would welcome writers who had been forced to
leave the USSR as well as citizens of republics which might decide
to leave the USSR in the future. Membership would not be incompatible
with membership of the old organization; indeed, Yevtushenko
suggested the material base of the new union should be the accumulated
funds of the old one. (Sarah Ashwin)

GORBACHEV-SALINAS TALKS. Gorbachev and Mexican President Carlos
Salinas held talks on July 4 to discuss the creation of a "new
economic and political order in the world," TASS reported July
4. Gorbachev stressed the importance of the Soviet Union's dialogue
with Mexico and said he hoped to be able to accept Salinas' invitation
to visit that Latin American country. According to a subsequent
announcement from Carlos Salinas' office in Mexico City, Gorbachev
plans to visit Mexico and the date will be set soon. Salinas'
office also noted that Yeltsin will also visit the Mexican president.
(Suzanne Crow)

PVO REFORM REVIEWED. Krasnaya zvezda of June 25 carried a "round-table"
discussion on reform in the Air Defense Forces. Included were
Army General Ivan Tret'yak, Commander-in-Chief of the PVO, and
other top-ranking commanders. The views expressed were uniformly
hard-line, and Tret'yak in particular emphasized the rapid technological
developments in Western airforces and the critical need for the
Soviet PVO to keep pace. Tret'yak and others pointed especially
to the Gulf War to support their arguments. They implied the
need for greater spending on modernization programs, criticized
conversion of defense industries, and rejected calls for eliminating
the PVO as a separate service. (Stephen Foye)



USSR--IN THE REPUBLICS



NAZARBAEV CALLS FOR SUMMIT OF REPUBLICAN LEADERS. Kazakh president
Nursultan Nazarbev proposed that the leaders of the fifteen Union
republics meet to discuss economic cooperation, Western news
agencies reported July 3. Nazarbaev told a news conference that
such a summit meeting would have no political implications and
that he continues to support the new Union treaty. He also said
that he does not support the positions taken by Ukraine and the
RSFSR regarding tax revenues forwarded from the republics to
the center. (Roman Solchanyk)

RSFSR DENATIONALIZATION LAWS. The RSFSR Supreme Soviet passed
legislation on July 3 that provided for the denationalization
of most of industry, trade, and services, and on July 4 for handing
over state housing to tenants, TASS and RIA reported July 3 and
4. The bulk of denationalized state property is to be sold at
auctions during the period 1992-95 to RSFSR residents for bonds
that will be issued in 1992. Employees of a given enterprise
will get a 30% discount on any purchase of its shares. Both of
the RSFSR laws appear to be uncoordinated and incompatible with
the all-Union legislation already passed or under deliberation.
(Keith Bush)

YANAEV AND KHASBULATOV PREPARED "NINE PLUS ONE" AGREEMENT. The
"nine plus one" agreement signed on April 23, was the result
of fruitful cooperation between USSR Vice-President Gennadii
Yanaev, and the delegation of the nine republics, RSFSR Supreme
Soviet First Deputy Chairman Ruslan Khasbulatov told Russian
Television on July 1. Khasbulatov said that key details of the
agreement, which some of which surprised Yeltsin supporters,
were elaborated by Khasbullatov himself and Yanaev and then presented
to the other republics. Khasbulatov also made it clear that he
views himself as the natural successor to Yeltsin as the Chairman
of the RSFSR Supreme Soviet. (Victor Yasmann)

RUTSKOI TO CREATE DEMOCRATIC RUSSIAN CP. On July 4, RSFSR television
quoted RSFSR president-elect and leader of the democratic Communists
bloc in the RSFSR parliament, Aleksandr Rutskoi as saying that
he remains a Communists. Rutskoi said that instead of breaking
ties with the CPSU, reformists in the Party should unite and
take initiative in this body in their own hands. Rutskoi said
that he himself wants to go into this direction and create the
Democratic Party of Communists of Russia which will attempt to
drive the conservative Russian CP out of the country's political
arena. (Vera Tolz)

STATE OF EMERGENCY LIFTED IN TWO RAIONS OF AZERBAIJAN. On July
4 Gorbachev exempted Azerbaijan's Dzhebrail and Geranboy raions,
from the state of emergency imposed on the NKAO, the Azerbaijani
raions adjacent to it, and Armenia's Goris raion on January 15,
1990, on the grounds that the situation there was normalised,
Western news agencies reported July 4, quoting TASS. Gorbachev
noted assurances given by Azerbaijani president Ayaz Mutalibov
that "all measures will be taken to ensure the safety of the
people living in the zone of conflict and preclude cases of unlawful
settlement of local inhabitants." (Liz Fuller)

DEMONSTRATIONS PLANNED FOR KOHL'S VISIT. Rukh is organizing a
demonstration in Kiev to protest Gorbachev's meeting with German
chancellor Helmut Kohl on the territory of sovereign Ukraine,
Radio Liberty's Ukrainian Service learned on July 4. Last week,
Supreme Soviet chairman Leonid Kravchuk complained that Ukrainians
had not been consulted about whether they wanted to host the
Gorbachev-Kohl rendezvous. (Kathy Mihalisko)

SHEVARNADZE MOVEMENT GETS COOL RECEPTION IN UKRAINE. So far,
the attitude of liberal Ukrainian Communists and noncommunists
toward the Democratic Reform movement has been largely negative,
according to interviews conducted July 4 for Radio Liberty's
Ukrainian service. Mykola Shul'ha, a Central Committee member
who heads the Ukrainian Supreme Soviet commission on internationality
relations, said the Shevardnadze-Yakovlev initiative has been
coolly received, but noted that the Ukrainian Party is itself
wracked by internal divisions. A copy of the Shevarnadze platform
received in Kiev refers to the USSR as "a union of sovereign
peoples"--that is not what Ukrainian democrats want to hear.
(Kathy Mihalisko)

GERMANY TO SEND TECHNOLOGY AND EQUIPMENT TO UKRAINE. Germany
intends to send to the Ukrainian republic technology and equipment
from unused army stocks, according to an announcement made July
4 on Deutschlandfunk by a member of the Germany Ministry of Defense.
The gift, with an estimated value of DM 21 million ($12.5 million),
will include 700 trucks, 70 pieces of light machinery, agricultural
technology, and medical equipment. The package is intended to
"strengthen Ukraine" and serve the medical needs of people in
the Chernobyl' region. The Ministry of Defense said it is ready
to prepare the technology and equipment for delivery by mid-August.
(Natalie Melnyczuk)

UKRAINIANS PROTEST CENTRAL TV PROGRAMMING. Ukrainian people's
deputy Roman Lubkivs'kyi raised the question of "Vremya's" tendentious
programming on developments in Ukraine, Radio Kiev reported July
4. Lubkivs'kyi proposed to the Supreme Soviet that it prepare
a resolution on the subject, that the Ukrainian procurator initiate
criminal proceedings against the "Vremya" editors for inflaming
inter-ethnic and inter-confessional passions, and that the accreditation
in Ukraine of those journalists responsible for "political provocations"
be lifted. (Roman Solchanyk)

CRIMEA AND THE UNION TREATY. A session of the Supreme Soviet
of the Crimean ASSR has approved the draft Union treaty "in the
main," Radio Kiev reported July 4. The session affirmed that
the Crimean ASSR is a constituent part of Ukraine and delegated
the parliament's chairman, Mykola Bahrov, to sign the treaty
after taking into consideration proposals from the Crimean and
Ukrainian Supreme Soviets. (Roman Solchanyk)

UKRAINIAN ANTI-CRISIS PROGRAM PASSED SECOND READING. The Ukrainian
Supreme Soviet has adopted Prime Minister Vitold Fokin's anti-crisis
program, after minor amendments, Radio Kiev reported July 4.
In order to implement the program, some Ukrainian and USSR laws,
among them the presidential decree on hard currency taxes on
Soviet foreign trade participants, had to be suspended. 70% of
Ukraine's hard currency earnings will now go to the republican
rather than the all-Union hard currency fund. (Valentyn Moroz)


FIRST OFFICIALLY REGISTERED UNEMPLOYED WILL RECEIVE BENEFITS.
6000 people have applied for unemployment benefits in Ukraine
since July 1, Radio Kiev reported July 4. Of these, 61 people
will receive unemployment benefits. Only 20% of those who applied
were people who have been laid off; most of the rest are recently
graduated students. (Valentyn Moroz)

NO CRIMINAL CASE AGAINST PAZNYAK. The Belorussian Supreme Soviet
rejected a request from the office of the republican prosecutor
to strip opposition leader Zyanon Paznyak of his deputy's immunity,
Radio Moscow reported July 3. Prosecutor Ryhor Tarnauski, a hard-line
Communist, wanted to begin a criminal case against Paznyak in
connection with an anti-Communist demonstration on November 7.
(Kathy Mihalisko)

GERMAN NATIONAL RAION FORMED. The Presidium of the RSFSR Supreme
Soviet has approved the formation of a German national raion
in the Altai Krai, Radio Mayak reported July 4. The new territorial
formation will consist of parts of the Slavgorod and Khabarovsk
raions. (Roman Solchanyk)

[As of 1300 CET]


[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

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