Fear of life in one form or another is the great thing to exorcise. - William James
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 244, 03 January 1991



BALTIC

BALTIC STATES


SOVIET TROOPS SURROUND PARTY HQ IN VILNIUS. Armed Soviet Interior
Ministry troops surrounded the headquarters of the Communist
Party in the Lithuanian capital on January 2, The New York Times
reports. Lithuanian television interviewed a unidentified major
who said the troops were "implementing a presidential decree
on guarding the property of the CPSU in Lithuania." The Communist
Party in Lithuania split into two in December 1989 with the majority
declaring its independence from the CPSU. The minority who remained
loyal to the CPSU continued to use the building which was protected
by both Soviet and Lithuanian guards. The Lithuanian guards have
now been removed. (Saulius Girnius)

MVD UNITS SEIZE MAIN PUBLISHING PLANT IN RIGA. Early yesterday
morning, special forces of the USSR Interior Ministry, carrying
weapons and the Soviet flag, marched into the Press Building
in Riga and took over the main publishing house in Latvia. Radio
Riga reported that the "Black Berets," as the units have been
nicknamed, were apparently acting mainly on orders of the Latvian
Communist Party which has been trying to reassert control over
the plant. They placed under office arrest the Press Building
director Kazimirs Dundurs and threatened physical violence if
he did not hand over his papers to the LCP; Dundurs refused to
comply with the demands and yesterday evening he was permitted
to leave the Press Building. (Dzintra Bungs)

PRINT WORKERS ANNOUNCE PROTEST STRIKE. Print workers at the Press
Building announced a protest strike as long as the Black Berets
try to control the building. Today none of the principal Latvian
newspapers appeared on the newstands. (Dzintra Bungs)

LATVIANS DEPLORE THE ACTION. Yesterday morning, Latvian government
officials tried to enter the Press Building to find out what
was going on, but were turned away by the Black Berets pointing
guns at them. That afternoon some 2,000 people picketed peacefully
the Latvian Communist Party headquarters and demanded the removal
of the Black Berets from the Press Building. A solidarity demonstration
was held in the northern Latvian town of Valmiera. (Dzintra Bungs)


GROMOV TO RIGA. Latvia's Supreme Council adopted a resolution
deploring the seizure of the Press Building and calling for justice
to be meted out to those breaking the law. Today Latvian government
leaders are scheduled to meet with USSR President Mikhail Gorbachev
and Defense Minister Dmitrii Yazov. In addition, USSR Deputy
Interior Minister Boris Gromov is expected in Riga for consultations.
Nikolai Mironenko, head of the MVS special units, already arrived
in Riga and talked this morning Latvia's Interior Minister Aloizs
Vaznis. (Dzintra Bungs)

SAVISAAR WARNS OF INCREASED SOVIET MILITARY ACTIVITY. While visiting
Helsinki, Estonian Prime Minister Edgar Savisaar linked the seizure
by MVD units of the Press Building in Riga to recent efforts
by the Soviet authorities to show the world that the situation
in Latvia was not stable and to provide a pretext for the Soviet
army to establish order there. He said similar incidents are
possible in Estonia, adding that that there are enough Soviet
troops in Estonia for "any kind of military operation." He said
Moscow would be able to find an excuse to use force against Estonia,
reported AP and Reuter on January 2. Savisaar reiterated Estonia's
intention to resist "presidential rule": "Estonia will reply
with civil disobedience if President Mikhail Gorbachev declares
a state of emergency in the republic and puts it under direct
presidential control." (Dzintra Bungs)

ESTONIA LAUNCHES PRIVATIZATION. Estonia has started the privatization
of state enterprises, TASS reported January 2. Six enterprises,
including textile factories and the Tallinn taxi-pool, will become
private property this year; eleven enterprises, including Estonia's
railroads, will remain state enterprises for the time being;
others will become state joint-stock companies, leasing or municipal
enterprises. (Saulius Girnius)

SOVIET TROOPS END PRISON DUTIES IN ESTONIA. Novosti reported
that troops of the USSR Interor Ministry would stop guarding
prisons and convoys of arrested persons in Estonia from December
25 because the republic had failed to provide a sufficient number
of recruits to the autumn call up to the Soviet army. (Saulius
Girnius)

ESTONIA'S IMMIGRATION QUOTA FOR 1991. Estonia's Supreme Council
decided that 2,290 persons would be permitted to enter the country
and register there as residents, according to Soviet TV reports
of December 22. The quota is apparently intended to control the
migration of people from various regions of the USSR to Estonia.
(Dzintra Bungs)

US AID FOR USSR AND BALTICS. On December 29, President George
Bush authorized up to one billion dollars in credits for the
Soviet Union, as well as Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, to buy
US farm products, AFP and NCA reported December 30. In a letter
to congressional leaders, the president reiterated the US policy
of not recognizing the "forcible incorporation of Estonia, Latvia
and Lithuania into the Soviet Union" during World War II and
affirmed US "support for the rights of the Baltic States to self-determination."
(Dzintra Bungs)

LANDSBERGIS IN NORWAY. Radio Vilnius reported today that President
Vytautas Landsbergis is visiting Oslo for a three-day visit.
He will speak today at an international political conference.
Tomorrow he will meet with Norwegian Prime Minister Gro Harlem
Bruntland and Foreign Minister Willi Deklerk who is also the
chairman of the European Parliament Foreign Affairs Commission.
(Saulius Girnius)

PRUNSKIENE IN AUSTRALIA. Lithuanian Prime Minister Kazimiera
Prunskiene arrived in Australia on December 24 to attend the
Melbourne opening, on December 26, of the "Lithuanian Days in
Australia." On December 27 she held talks with the Australian
Wool Corporation and indicated that Lithuania could process 2,000
tons of wool or even more if Australia would provide financial
aid. On December 28 she met with Australian Prime Minister Bob
Hawke, Primary Industries Minister John Kerin and opposition
leader John Hewson. (Saulius Girnius)

STOP PRESS

MOSCOW'S INTENTIONS IN RIGA AND VILNIUS UNCLEAR. The timing of
the recent events in the Latvian and Lithuanian capitals suggests
that the use of interior ministry troops was coordinated and
that the central Soviet authorities intended to make some kind
of public statement regarding the situation in the Baltic states.
What that statement might be, and what is the ultimate purpose
of the introduction of armed units, cannot at present be said.
The Deputy Chairman of Latvia's Supreme Council, Andrejs Krastins,
told RFE's Latvian Service this morning he is not ruling out
the possibility that these events might be the prelude to stronger
measures on Moscow's part. The situation may become clearer if
and when General Gromov arrives in Latvia and after the talks
that Latvian leaders expect to have in Moscow later today with
Gorbachev, Yazov and officials of the CPSU Central Committee's
Administration of Affairs Department. (dzintra Bungs)



USSR

USSR--ALL-UNION AFFAIRS

SHEVARDNADZE SPEAKS. In his first public comments since his resignation
December 20, Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze told
Moscow News he resigned as foreign minister because he feared
military crackdowns similar to those in Tbilisi (April 1989)
and Baku (January 1990). Shevardnadze criticized Gorbachev's
government as a being talkshop in which problems are endlessly
debated, decisions slowly made, and laws never enforced. Shevardnadze
characterized the concept of Presidential Rule as a "punitive
sanction" that would not solve problems. The interview was carried
in an advance issue of the January 6 edition of Moscow News and
was summarized by AP and Reuters. (Suzanne Crow)

SHEVARDNADZE'S PLANS. Asked by Moscow News about his plans for
the future, Shevardnadze said he would like to create a foreign
policy association. (Suzanne Crow)

SHEVARDNADZE'S SUCCESSOR. Shevardnadze is expected to remain
in his post until Gorbachev names a successor. According to statements
yesterday by Shevardnadze aide and Foreign Ministry Spokesman
Vitalii Churkin, "the situation may clarify itself in the near
future." "The president is to take a decision," TASS reports.
The front runner appears to be Gorbachev's special envoy Yevgenii
Primakov. Other names include Aleksandr Bessmertnykh, ambassador
to the United States; and Vladimir Petrovsky, Deputy Foreign
Minister. Less likely candidates include Gennadii Yanaev, recently
elected USSR Vice President; and Aleksandr Dzasokhov, Politburo
member and chairman of the International Affairs Committee of
the USSR Supreme Soviet. (Suzanne Crow)

KONDRASHOV ON SHEVARDNADZE RESIGNATION. Disagreements with the
military played a role in Shevardnadze's resignation but were
not the only reason for it, veteran foreign affairs journalist
Stanislav Kondrashov told Soviet television December 31. The
real reason was that Soviet foreign policy has lost its impetus.
Kondrashov described "new thinking" as a drama in three acts.
In the first act, Gorbachev and Shevardnadze rescued the USSR
from international isolation, but the second act saw a too hasty
dismantling of the Warsaw Pact and resulted in a humiliating
Soviet retreat. Now, in the third act, Soviet society is beginning
to free itself from imperial ambitions, Kondrashov said. To illustrate
his point, he compared the 1989 attacks on Andrei Sakharov for
his opposition to Soviet involvement in Afghanistan with recent
protests by both military and population against the possibility
of Soviet involvement in the Gulf crisis. (Victor Yasmann)

KONDRASHOV: "GORBACHEV NEEDS THE ARMY." Kondrashov expands on
these statements in a commentary in Izvestia today. Arguing that
Gorbachev's dependence on military support is the reason why
the Soviet president was unwilling to defend his foreign minister
against criticism by conservatives, Kondrashov writes that, today,
"The president needs the army more than ever before, and he does
not want the army's patience to run out." (NCA/Elizabeth Teague)


MORE ON GORBACHEV MEETING WITH OFFICER-DEPUTIES. Reports continue
to surface with more details on Gorbachev's crucial November
13 meeting with over 1,000 officer-deputies--an event that apparently
spurred Gorbachev's turn to the right. On December 24, The New
York Times reported that the censored official accounts of the
meeting may have understated the extreme hostility that Gorbachev
faced among the officers. Krasnaya zvezda of December 11, meanwhile,
published a letter denying charges by progressive officers that
the meeting had been stage-managed by the Defense Ministry and
Main Political Administration to confront Gorbachev with the
views only of conservatives. (Stephen Foye)

REGISTRATION OF POLITICAL PARTIES RUNS INTO PROBLEM. The USSR
Ministry of Justice has begun officially registing political
parties, as required by the Soviet law on public associations.
TASS called the registration the USSR's first practical step
to a multiparty system, but noted the process had immedidately
run into considerable problems. The agency quoted the justice
ministry as saying all 22 applications for registration received
so far were incorrectly submitted. The ministry did not say how
the applications were incorrect, but said it would hold a special
meeting to brief representatives of parties on the necessary
requirements. (Vera Tolz)

MOISEEV HITS NATIONAL ARMIES. The General Staff Chief has rejected
proposals made at the Congress of People's Deputies to divide
the army into strategic and regional forces. Mikhail Moiseev
told Izvestiya on December 22 that such proposals would lower
Soviet defense capabilities and that they failed to consider
the military threat provided by NATO. He said the USSR spends
approximately 700 million rubles per year maintaining only one
of the Western border districts, and charged that republics could
not afford to maintain viable forces. More ominously, he claimed
that the separation of even one armed service branch would lead
to the destruction of the entire security system. (Stephen Foye)


SERVICEMEN TO CARRY WEAPONS. The Defense Ministry announced on
December 29 that officers, naval and army warrant officers, and
servicemen on extended duty in specified regions will be allowed
to carry personal weapons for self-defense, TASS announced. The
Ministry Press Center said the number of cases of violence and
reprisal against servicemen and their families is increasing.
According to AFP, the authorization to carry weapons applies
to military personnel on duty in regions where such incidents
are rife. (NCA/Stephen Foye)

SHMELEV ON "INSTANT GRATIFICATION." Literaturnaya gazeta (No.
51, 1990) carries a wide-ranging discussion between Nikolai Shmelev
and the emigre political scientist Aleksandr Yanov. Shmelev renews
his call for substantial Western loans--$25-30 billion--to keep
the Soviet economy functioning for 18-24 months while meaningful
reform is implemented. Otherwise, "if this monster collapses,
it will pull the entire world into the hole with it." Yanov proposes
the creation of a joint Soviet-American "conciliation committee"
to guarantee the irreversibility of an agreement between Gorbachev
and Yeltsin to sink their differences and to work for the country's
salvation. (Keith Bush)

ATTACKS CONTINUE. There is no let-up in Sovetskaya Rossiya's
criticism of reformers elected last year to local soviets. On
December 16, the newspaper published a lengthy attack on the
chairman of the Moscow city soviet, Gavriil Popov, accusing him
of having been an apologist for the old system before perestroika
and of buiding himself an expensive country house. The same issue
complained that newly elected leaders of other local soviets
are trying to grab control of publications that used to be jointly
published by the soviets and Party. Finally, Sovetskaya Rossiya
on December 19 alleged that all the places on the board of the
recently established Moscow Business Bank have been seized by
leaders of the Moscow city soviet. (Vera Tolz)

UNIFICATION CHURCH ACTIVE AMONG SOVIET STUDENTS. Radio Rossii
reported on December 23 that the Reverend Moon's Unification
Church now has a Soviet branch. The establishment of the Church
happened quietly and was at first hardly noticed in the USSR.
The Church concentrates its activities on the press and on Soviet
students. Groups of Moscow students are being invited to visit
the USA at the invitation of the Reverend Moon; Radio Rossii
reported that many of these students have signed up as Church
members. (Oxana Antic)

PRIEST INVESTIGATING MEN MURDER ALSO KILLED. AP quoted on January
2 INTERFAX news agency as saying that Hegumen Lasar', a member
of the Church Commission investigating the murder of the Russian
Orthodox priest Alexander Men' has been killed in his Moscow
apartment. According to AP, INTERFAX quoted the police as saying
Hegumen Lasar' died during an attempted robbery of his apartment
but, the agency goes on, unidentified "close associates" of the
priest claimed there were no indications pointing to a burglary.
Gorbachev ordered an official investigation into the murder of
Father Men' in September 1990 and the Church also set up an inquiry.
(Oxana Antic)

BOGOMOLOV URGES FUNDAMENTAL CHANGE OF POLICY. The well-known
Soviet academician Oleg Bogomolov told Germany's Bild am Sonntag
last weekend that "civil war and mass exodus" from the USSR can
be averted only if Gorbachev makes a fundamental change of course.
If not, said Bogomolov, who acts as an adviser to Boris Yeltsin,
chaos will ensue. His interview was summarized by DPA. (Elizabeth
Teague)

NO PLANS TO CLOSE EMBASSIES IN GULF. The Soviet Union does not
plan to close its embassies in the Gulf despite the approach
of the January 15 UN deadline for Iraqi troops to leave Kuwait,
Soviet Foreign Ministry Spokesman Vitalii Churkin said yesterday.
Churkin told reporters that Soviet embassies in the region will
"continue to function," including the Soviet mission in Baghdad.
He declined to reveal the number of Soviet diplomats in the Iraqi
capital. (Suzanne Crow)

USSR--REPUBLICS

CURFEW LIFTED IN DUSHANBE. TASS, quoting Izvestia, reported yesterday
that the curfew imposed in Dushanbe more than ten months ago
has finally been lifted. The state of emergency declared during
the outbreak of violence in the city in February, 1990, remains
in effect. The order removing the curfew noted that the situation
in the Tajik capital has stabilized. (Bess Brown)

YELTSIN PROMISES DUAL CITIZENSHIP FOR RSFSR. Yeltsin told a news
conference on December 25 that a dual citizenship policy will
be introduced in the RSFSR for Russians living abroad. Yeltsin
said Russians who have taken citizenship in other countries will
be able to enjoy "all rights and responsibilities" in the RSFSR
too. (NCA)

KALININGRAD REGION OPENS TO FOREIGNERS. Kaliningrad, the westernmost
region of the RSFSR, was officially opened to foreigners January
1. The region, which has strong scientific and industrial sectors,
including the largest ice-free port on the Baltic sea, had been
a closed area since the end of World War II. (NCA)

DRINK SHORTAGE SPARKS RIOTING IN SIBERIAN CITY. TASS reported
December 30 that angry crowds rioted in the eastern Siberian
city of Chita to protest a shortage of alcohol for the new year's
holiday. TASS said the disturbance occurred because thousands
of people were unable to exchange ration coupons for wine and
vodka. It was not clear when the riot occurred, but TASS said
the crowds blocked traffic, lit bonfires and pulled down lamp-posts.
(NCA)

GASOLINE SHORTAGE IN SOVIET FAR EAST. The supply of gasoline
and other fuels is running extremely short in parts of the Soviet
Far East. TASS reported December 29 that almost 90% of the cars
in Vladivostok were idle and that there was no gasoline at filling
stations. TASS said the shortages were causing frustrated motorists
to smash pumps and set them afire. Other types of transport have
also been affected. Many flights from Vladivostok have been cancelled
and the fishing fleets and railways are experiencing interruptions
in fuel spplies. TASS said the situation was worst in the Magadan,
Sakhalin, and Kamchatka regions. (NCA)

ODESSA REGION TO RECEIVE CNN VIA SATELLITE. Radio Kiev announced
December 27 that part of Ukraine's Odessa region would be able
to receive Cable News Network's world news via satellite "on
the eve of the New Year." (CMD)

UKRAINIAN AUTOCEPHALOUS ORTHODOX CHURCH. The Ukrainian Autocephalous
Orthodox Church, which was reconstituted last year, now has more
than 1,000 parishes and over 500 priests in the republic, Radio
Kiev reported yesterday. The November issue of Religia v SSSR,
however, fails to list the Autocephalists in its statistical
compendium of religious organizations in Ukraine. (Roman Solchanyk)


MOLDAVIAN REACTION TO GORBACHEV DECREE. On January 2 TASS quoted
Moldavian president Mircea Snegur as saying he will do everything
to implement the Moldavian parliament's resolution on Gorbachev's
decree of December 22. The republican Supreme Soviet adopted
the decree "as a whole" on December 30. TASS said the Provisional
Committee of the would-be Gagauz republic pledged in an appeal
to Gorbachev that the Gagauz people would "achieve their right
to self-determination" only within the framework of the law.
(Michael Shafir).

KISHINEV DEMONSTRATION AGAINST NEW UNION TREATY. According to
a TASS dispatch from the Moldavian capital, hundreds of people
demonstrated in Kishinev on January 2, urging the republic not
to sign the new Union treaty. TASS said demonstrators chanted
"anti-communist slogans" and called for a general strike. Traffic
was blocked for several hours. TASS said the Moldavian parliament
had not yet decided whether to sign the new treaty. It quoted
president Mircea Snegur as saying that it was "up to the people
of Moldavia" to decide on the issue. (Michael Shafir).

ROMANIAN CITIZENSHIP FOR SOVIET MOLDAVIANS? At a Bucharest meeting
organized December 21 by the extraparliamentary opposition group
"Civic Alliance," writer Stelian Tanase called on the Romanian
government to grant citizenship "to all Bassarabians, Moldavians,
or whatever name one wants to use." Tanase's speech was carried
live by Radio Bucharest. (Michael Shafir)

BASSARABIAN ROMANIANS URGED TO APPLY FOR MOLDAVIAN CITIZENSHIP.
The Moldavian Popular Front and the Romanian association Pro
Bassarabia and Bukovina have called on all Romanians from Bassarrabia
and Northern Bukovina and their descendants to apply for Moldavian
citizenship, Radio Iasi said December 29. The Moldavian Supreme
Soviet is being urged to adopt appropriate legislation. (Michael
Shafir)

ROMANIAN OFFICIAL VISITS KISHINEV. Radio Bucharest reported December
24 that Neagu Urdoi, director of the official news agency Rompres,
had been received in Kishinev by Moldavian Supreme Soviet chairman
Alexandru Mosianu. The radio said the two men discussed "the
social and political situation created in the Republic of Moldavia...by
the separatist movement encouraged by the most conservative forces
in the Soviet Union." (Michael Shafir)

NEW POLITICAL PARTY IN MOLDAVIA. A new political party, the Democratic
Party for Moldavia's Renaissance and Prosperity, has been set
up in Kishinev. Radio Bucharest on December 25 quoted its president,
Gheorghe Ghimpu, as saying the party supports parliamentary democracy,
political and economic pluralism, "the completion of the national
territories of Moldavians," and "general human values." (Michael
Shafir)

ALLIANCE FOR INDEPENDENCE CREATED. An organization calling itself
the "December 16 National Alliance for Independence" was recently
created in Moldavia. In a Moldova Pres dispatch carried by Radio
Bucharest on December 29, the alliance drew attention to recent
signs indicating that "an offensive against national liberation
movements" was in preparation, and appealed for support to democratic
forces in Moldavia, Romania, and the USSR in general. (Michael
Shafir)

ROMANIAN BRANCH OF POPULAR FRONT APPEALS TO GORBACHEV. Radio
Iasi said January 1 that the Bucharest branch of the Romanian
Popular Front has appealed to Gorbachev to undo the Ribbentrop-Molotov
pact by giving Moldavia back the three provinces it lost and
allowing it freely to decide whether to sign the Union treaty.
It added that it had joined the National Alliance for Independence.
(Michael Shafir).

TASS ON MOLDAVIAN ECONOMY. TASS said December 26 that some 40%
of Moldavia's enterprises could face bankrupcy in the wake of
a new taxation law due to go into effect this month in the republic.
Moldavian Finance Minister Valeri Muravski said subsidies to
low-profit enterprises are being cut; he added that Moldavia
expects a budget deficit of over 1,000 million rubles in 1991.
(Michael Shafir)

UNIVERSITY CHAIR RENAMED. Moldova Pres reported December 26 that
the former Moldavian language chair at Cernauti (Tchernowitzy)
University has been renamed the Romanian language chair and gives
tuition to 54 full-time and 75 external students, most of whom
come from three districts in Ukraine inhabited by a Romanian
majority. However, only 30% of the courses are taught in Romanian,
as against 70% in Ukrainian or Russian. Moldova Pres added that
the Romanian population in Bukovina faces difficulties because
primary and secondary Romanian language schools have been closed
down in several settlements. (Michael Shafir)

BULGARIANS PROTEST DISCRIMINATION IN MOLDAVIA AND UKRAINE. Radio
Sofia said December 22 that the Committee for the Preservation
of Bulgarian Traditions from the east Bulgarian city of Silven
has protested that Bulgarians living in Moldavia are being forced
to speak Romanian. The committee said use of the Bulgarian language
had been banned and physical force was being used against those
speaking Bulgarian in streets or public institutions. The committee
claimed Bulgarian villages had been attacked, houses set on fire,
and schools closed down. It said a similar situation existed
in Ukraine. (Michael Shafir)

MOLDAVIAN-GEORGIAN COLLABORATION. An agreement on economic and
cultural collaboration between the Georgian and the Moldavian
republics was signed in Tbilisi by the prime ministers of the
two republics on December 23. Radio Bucharest said that the two
premiers agreed to set up "permanent representation [missions]"
in their respective capitals. (Michael Shafir)

LEONIDA LARI DENOUNCES NEW UNION TREATY. Leonida Lari, a Moldavian
poetess and prominent member of the Moldavian Popular Front,
has criticized Gorbachev's proposed Union treaty. Interviewed
by the independent Romanian daily Romania Libera December 27,
Lari said that, if Moldavia signed, it would be acknowledging
its dependence on the USSR and that the territories taken away
from it do not belong to it. Lari called for negotiations with
Ukraine over exchanging the Transdniestrian territories for Northern
Bukovina and Southern Bessarabia. (Michael Shafir)

TROUBLE AHEAD FOR COMMUTERS? Subway trains in some major Soviet
cities, Moscow included, may stop running in the new year, an
official of the USSR ministry of railways told Soviet television
December 30. As of January 1, metro systems will be funded not
out of all-Union revenues, but by individual republics and cities.
The official said local authorities in Minsk, Leningrad, Tbilisi,
Yerevan plan to raise metro fares, but that other cities, which
do not plan to raise fares, may have to suspend services because
of a shortage of money for wages, electricity, and maintenance.
(NCA/CMD)

ALLIANCE FRANCAISE REVIVED IN LENINGRAD. The "Alliance Francaise"
society, which existed in St Petersburg until 1917, has been
revived. It plans to open French cultural center, offer courses
in the French language, and arrange exhibitions and concerts
in order to further Franco-Russian cultural relations. (CMD)


RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS FOR TERNOPOL. Moscow News (No. 50, 1990) reports
that the deputy chairman of the Ternopol City Soviet's commission
on culture and national revival recommended that Soviet-style
New Year celebrations not be held, because they would take place
during the pre-Christmas fast, which is observed from November
28 to January 6. Festivities should be held only after January
7, which is Orthodox Christmas, the commission said, proposing
that Christmas, St. Nicholas' Day and New Year (Old Style) be
recognized as holidays. The Soviet was said to have accepted
the commission's proposal. (Oxana Antic)

[as of 1300 CET]


[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

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